Gaps in knowledge and future directions for the use of faecal microbiota transplant in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

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Title: Gaps in knowledge and future directions for the use of faecal microbiota transplant in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease
Authors: Yalchin, M
Segal, JP
Mullish, BH
Quraishi, MN
Iqbal, T
Marchesi, JR
Hart, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Faecal microbiota transplant (FMT) has now been established into clinical guidelines for the treatment of recurrent and refractory Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI). Its therapeutic application in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is currently at an early stage. To date there have been four randomised controlled trials for FMT in IBD and a multitude of observational studies. However significant gaps in our knowledge regarding optimum methods for FMT preparation, technical and logistics of its administration, as well as mechanistic underpinnings, still remain. This article aims to highlight these gaps by reviewing evidence and makes key recommendations on the direction of future studies in this field. In addition, we provide an overview of the current evidence of potential mechanistics of FMT in IBD.
Issue Date: 31-Jan-2019
Date of Acceptance: 6-Nov-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/74876
ISSN: 1756-2848
Publisher: SAGE Publications (UK and US)
Journal / Book Title: Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology
Copyright Statement: This paper is embargoed until publication. Once published it will be available fully open access.
Sponsor/Funder: Medical Research Council
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Funder's Grant Number: MR/R00875/1
MR/R000875/1
RDA27
Publication Status: Accepted
Embargo Date: publication subject to indefinite embargo
Appears in Collections:Division of Surgery
Faculty of Medicine



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