Cognitive impairment and health- related quality of life following traumatic brain injury

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Title: Cognitive impairment and health- related quality of life following traumatic brain injury
Authors: Gorgoraptis, N
Zaw-Linn, J
Feeney, C
Tenorio-Jimenez, C
Niemi, M
Malik, A
Ham, T
Goldstone, AP
Sharp, DJ
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: BACKGROUNDCognitive impairment is a common and disabling consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) but its impact on health-related quality of life is not well understood.OBJECTIVETo investigate the relationship between cognitive impairment and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after TBI.METHODSRetrospective, cross-sectional study of a specialist TBI outpatient clinic patient sample. Outcome measures: Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination Tool - Revised (ACE-R), and SF-36 quality of life, Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) questionnaires.RESULTS240 adults were assessed: n = 172 (71.7% ) moderate-severe, 41 (23.8% ) mild, 27 (11.3% ) symptomatic TBI, 174 (72.5% ) male, median age (range): 44 (22-91) years. TBI patients reported poorer scores on all domains of SF-36 compared to age-matched UK normative data. Cognitively impaired patients reported poorer HRQoL on the physical, social role and emotional role functioning, and mental health domains. Cognitive impairment predicted poorer HRQoL on the social and emotional role functioning domains, independently of depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, daytime sleepiness and TBI severity. Mediation analysis revealed that the effect of depressive symptoms on the emotional role functioning domain of HRQoL was partially mediated by cognitive dysfunction.CONCLUSIONCognitive impairment is associated with worse health-related quality of life after TBI and partially mediates the effect of depressive symptoms on emotional role functioning.
Issue Date: 20-Jun-2019
Date of Acceptance: 1-Jun-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/70987
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182618
ISSN: 1387-2877
Publisher: IOS Press
Start Page: 321
End Page: 331
Journal / Book Title: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume: 44
Issue: 3
Copyright Statement: © 2019 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.
Sponsor/Funder: Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
National Institute for Health Research
The Academy of Medical Sciences
Funder's Grant Number: RDA03_79560
RDC04
NIHR-RP-011-048
N/A
Keywords: SF-36
TBI
cognition
depression
sleep disturbance
SF-36
TBI
cognition
depression
sleep disturbance
1103 Clinical Sciences
1702 Cognitive Sciences
1109 Neurosciences
Neurology & Neurosurgery
Publication Status: Published
Conference Place: Netherlands
Online Publication Date: 2019-06-20
Appears in Collections:Department of Medicine



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