Test of a cubic spline interface for physical processes with a 1-D third-order spectral element model

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Title: Test of a cubic spline interface for physical processes with a 1-D third-order spectral element model
Authors: Steppeler, J
Li, J
Fang, F
Zhu, J
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: A common way to introduce physical processes into numerical models of the atmosphere is to call the parameterization at every grid point. This can lead to considerable errors. A simple 1-D example is proposed to illustrate that when a physical process occurs at one grid point only, a considerable sampling error may occur, with the result that only a fraction of the true impact of this process is seen. The interface to the physical parameterization in numerical weather prediction model using a third-order 1-D spectral element method (SEM3) model is investigated by homogeneous advection. In SEM3, the grid points, called principal nodes, are at boundaries of computational intervals and two more collocation points in the interior of each cell. This article argues that it is sufficient to do the physical parameterization for principal nodes only that creating the interior grid-point values of physics schemes by linear interpolation. This is called the spline interface method. A simple condensation model of water is taken as an example. Compared to the standard paramaterization, which computes the physical processes at every grid point, the spline interface method is more accurate and has a potential to save computer time. It turns out that the standard method creates a noisy wave which can easily be filtered by hyperviscosity. In the spline interface to the condensation physics, the condensation is done at every third grid point only. Third-order spline methods are used to represent the condensation at other points. The method using a smaller grid to compute condensation represented the condensation process more accurately and produced less of the computational noise. This version could be run without hyperviscosity, as no significant computational noise mode was generated by condensation. By doing physical processes only at every third grid point computer time may be saved.
Issue Date: 1-Apr-2019
Date of Acceptance: 1-Apr-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/70434
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/16000870.2019.1591846
ISSN: 0280-6495
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Start Page: 1
End Page: 6
Journal / Book Title: Tellus Series A: Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography
Volume: 71
Issue: 1
Copyright Statement: © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Sponsor/Funder: Engineering & Physical Science Research Council (E
Funder's Grant Number: RG80519
Keywords: Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
Oceanography
physical process interface
L-Galerkin method
spectral element method
sparse grid
physical parameterization
COORDINATE
MOUNTAIN
GRIDS
Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
Oceanography
physical process interface
L-Galerkin method
spectral element method
sparse grid
physical parameterization
COORDINATE
MOUNTAIN
GRIDS
Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
0401 Atmospheric Sciences
0405 Oceanography
Publication Status: Published
Open Access location: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/16000870.2019.1591846
Online Publication Date: 2019-04-01
Appears in Collections:Earth Science and Engineering



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