Altmetric

Can shared leadership enhance clinical team management? A systematic review

File Description SizeFormat 
LHS03.docxAccepted version169.9 kBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Title page.docxSupporting information73.71 kBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Figure 1.docxSupporting information100.74 kBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Table 1.docxSupporting information52.59 kBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Table 2.docxSupporting information73.87 kBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Supplementary Files 1 and 2.docxSupporting information107.15 kBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Title: Can shared leadership enhance clinical team management? A systematic review
Authors: Aufegger, L
Shariq, O
Bicknell, C
Ashrafian, H
Darzi, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Purpose Research in psychology or management science has shown that shared leadership (SL) enhances information sharing, fosters participation and empowers team members within the decision-making processes, ultimately improving the quality of performance outcomes. Little has been done and, thus, less is known of the value and use of SL in acute healthcare teams. The purpose of this study is to (1) explore, identify and critically assess patterns and behaviour of SL in acute healthcare teams; and (2) evaluate to what extent SL may benefit and accomplish safer care in acute patient treatment and healthcare delivery. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted a review that followed the PRISMA-P reporting guidelines. A variety of sources were searched in April 2018 for studies containing primary research that focused on SL in acute healthcare teams. The outcome of interest was a well-specified assessment of SL, and an evaluation of the extent SL may enhance team performance, lead to safer patient care and healthcare delivery in acute healthcare teams. Findings After the study selection process, 11 out of 1,383 studies were included in the review. Studies used a qualitative, quantitative or mixed-methods approach. Emerging themes based on behavioural observations that contributed to SL were: shared mental model; social support and situational awareness; and psychological safety. High-performing teams showed more SL behaviour, teams with less seniority displayed more traditional leadership styles and SL was associated with increased team satisfaction. Research limitations/implications Evidence to date suggests that SL may be of benefit to improve performance outcomes in acute healthcare team settings. However, the discrepancy of SL assessments within existing studies and their small sample sizes highlights the need for a large, good quality randomized controlled trial to validate this indication. Originality/value Although studies have acknowledged the relevance of SL in healthcare service and delivery, a systematic, evidence-based and robust evaluation of behavioural patterns and the benefits of SL in this field is still missing.
Issue Date: 7-May-2019
Date of Acceptance: 3-Dec-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/70107
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1108/LHS-06-2018-0033
ISSN: 1751-1879
Publisher: Emerald
Start Page: 309
End Page: 335
Journal / Book Title: Leadership in Health Services
Volume: 32
Issue: 2
Copyright Statement: © Emerald Publishing Limited 2019. Published by Emerald Publishing Limited. Licensed re-use rights only
Sponsor/Funder: Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
National Institute of Health Research
Funder's Grant Number: RDB04
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Policy & Services
Health Care Sciences & Services
Performance
Leadership
Evaluation
Health services
DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP
PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY
NONTECHNICAL SKILLS
SITUATION AWARENESS
TRANSACTIVE MEMORY
OPERATING-ROOM
CULTURE
PERCEPTIONS
PERFORMANCE
HOSPITALS
Evaluation
Health services
Leadership
Performance
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Policy & Services
Health Care Sciences & Services
Performance
Leadership
Evaluation
Health services
DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP
PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY
NONTECHNICAL SKILLS
SITUATION AWARENESS
TRANSACTIVE MEMORY
OPERATING-ROOM
CULTURE
PERCEPTIONS
PERFORMANCE
HOSPITALS
15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2019-05-07
Appears in Collections:Division of Surgery
Faculty of Medicine



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Creative Commons