Altmetric

Effect of body mass index on depression in a UK cohort of 363 037 obese patients: A longitudinal analysis of transition

File Description SizeFormat 
Dep-Manuscript-14.docxFile embargoed until 05 March 2020132.56 kBMicrosoft Word    Request a copy
Title: Effect of body mass index on depression in a UK cohort of 363 037 obese patients: A longitudinal analysis of transition
Authors: Moussa, OM
Ardissino, M
Kulatilake, P
Faraj, A
Muttoni, E
Darzi, A
Ziprin, P
Scholtz, S
Purkayastha, S
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: With obesity levels increasing, it is important to consider the mental health risks associated with this condition to optimize patient care. Links between depression and obesity have been explored, but few studies focus on the risk profiles of patients across stratified body mass index (BMI) classes above 30 kg/m2 . This study aims to determine the impact of BMI on depression risk in patients with obesity and to investigate trends of depression in a large cohort of British patients with BMI > 30 kg/m2 . A nationwide primary care database, the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), was analysed for diagnoses of obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m2 ). Obese patients were then sub-classified into seven BMI categories. Primary health care-based records of patients entered in the CPRD were analysed. A total of 363 037 patients had a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 ; of these patients 97 392 (26.8%) also had a diagnosis of depression. Absolute event rates over time and hazard risk of depression were analysed by BMI category. On Cox regression analysis of time to development of depression, the cumulative hazard increased significantly and linearly across BMI groups (P < 0.001). Compared to those with BMI 30 to 35 kg/m2 , patients with BMI 35 to 40 kg/m2 had a 20% higher risk of depression (hazard ratio [HR] 1.206, confidence interval [CI] 1.170-1.424), and those with BMI > 60 kg/m2 had a 98% higher risk (HR 1.988, CI 1.513-2.612). This study identified the prevalence and time course of depression in a cohort of obese patients in the United Kingdom. Findings suggest the risk of depression is directly proportional to BMI above 30 kg/m2 . Therefore, clinicians should note higher BMI levels confer increased risk of depression.
Issue Date: 5-Mar-2019
Date of Acceptance: 4-Feb-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/69488
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cob.12305
ISSN: 1758-8103
Publisher: Wiley
Journal / Book Title: Clinical Obesity
Volume: 9
Issue: 3
Copyright Statement: © 2019 World Obesity Federation. This is the accepted version of the following article: Moussa, OM, Ardissino, M, Kulatilake, P, et al. Effect of body mass index on depression in a UK cohort of 363 037 obese patients: A longitudinal analysis of transition. Clin Obes. 2019; 9:e12305, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cob.12305
Sponsor/Funder: Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust
Funder's Grant Number: RDOTH 79560
Keywords: body mass index
depression
depression risk
obesity
Publication Status: Published
Conference Place: England
Embargo Date: 2020-03-05
Article Number: e12305
Online Publication Date: 2019-03-05
Appears in Collections:Division of Surgery



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Creative Commonsx