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Stress-strain evolution during peak-ring formation: a case study of the Chicxulub impact structure

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Title: Stress-strain evolution during peak-ring formation: a case study of the Chicxulub impact structure
Authors: Rae, A
Collins, G
Poelchau, M
Riller, U
Davison, T
Grieve, R
Osinski, G
Morgan, J
IODP‐ICDP Expedition 364 Scientists
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Deformation is a ubiquitous process that occurs to rocks during impact cratering; thus, quantifying the deformation of those rocks can provide first‐order constraints on the process of impact cratering. Until now, specific quantification of the conditions of stress and strain within models of impact cratering has not been compared to structural observations. This paper describes a methodology to analyze stress and strain within numerical impact models. This method is then used to predict deformation and its cause during peak‐ring formation: a complex process that is not fully understood, requiring remarkable transient weakening and causing a significant redistribution of crustal rocks. The presented results are timely due to the recent Joint International Ocean Discovery Program and International Continental Scientific Drilling Program drilling of the peak ring within the Chicxulub crater, permitting direct comparison between the deformation history within numerical models and the structural history of rocks from a peak ring. The modeled results are remarkably consistent with observed deformation within the Chicxulub peak ring, constraining the following: (1) the orientation of rocks relative to their preimpact orientation; (2) total strain, strain rates, and the type of shear during each stage of cratering; and (3) the orientation and magnitude of principal stresses during each stage of cratering. The methodology and analysis used to generate these predictions is general and, therefore, allows numerical impact models to be constrained by structural observations of impact craters and for those models to produce quantitative predictions.
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2019
Date of Acceptance: 24-Jan-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/67113
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2018JE005821
ISSN: 2169-9097
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
Journal / Book Title: Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets
Copyright Statement: ©2019. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
Sponsor/Funder: Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC)
Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)
Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)
Funder's Grant Number: ST/N000803/1
NE/P005217/1
NE/P011195/1
Publication Status: Published online
Embargo Date: 2019-07-31
Online Publication Date: 2019-01-31
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Engineering
Earth Science and Engineering



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