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Coffee and tea drinking in relation to the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study

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Title: Coffee and tea drinking in relation to the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study
Authors: Zamora-Ros, R
Alghamdi, MA
Cayssials, V
Franceschi, S
Almquist, M
Hennings, J
Sandström, M
Tsilidis, KK
Weiderpass, E
Boutron-Ruault, M-C
Hammer Bech, B
Overvad, K
Tjønneland, A
Petersen, KEN
Mancini, FR
Mahamat-Saleh, Y
Bonnet, F
Kühn, T
Fortner, RT
Boeing, H
Trichopoulou, A
Bamia, C
Martimianaki, G
Masala, G
Grioni, S
Panico, S
Tumino, R
Fasanelli, F
Skeie, G
Braaten, T
Lasheras, C
Salamanca-Fernández, E
Amiano, P
Chirlaque, M-D
Barricarte, A
Manjer, J
Wallström, P
Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB
Peeters, PH
Khaw, K-T
Wareham, NJ
Schmidt, JA
Aune, D
Byrnes, G
Scalbert, A
Agudo, A
Rinaldi, S
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: PURPOSE: Coffee and tea constituents have shown several anti-carcinogenic activities in cellular and animal studies, including against thyroid cancer (TC). However, epidemiological evidence is still limited and inconsistent. Therefore, we aimed to investigate this association in a large prospective study. METHODS: The study was conducted in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) cohort, which included 476,108 adult men and women. Coffee and tea intakes were assessed through validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 748 first incident differentiated TC cases (including 601 papillary and 109 follicular TC) were identified. Coffee consumption (per 100 mL/day) was not associated either with total differentiated TC risk (HRcalibrated 1.00, 95% CI 0.97-1.04) or with the risk of TC subtypes. Tea consumption (per 100 mL/day) was not associated with the risk of total differentiated TC (HRcalibrated 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-1.02) and papillary tumor (HRcalibrated 0.99, 95% CI 0.95-1.03), whereas an inverse association was found with follicular tumor risk (HRcalibrated 0.90, 95% CI 0.81-0.99), but this association was based on a sub-analysis with a small number of cancer cases. CONCLUSIONS: In this large prospective study, coffee and tea consumptions were not associated with TC risk.
Issue Date: 10-Dec-2018
Date of Acceptance: 1-Dec-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/66648
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-018-1874-z
ISSN: 0044-264X
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Journal / Book Title: European Journal of Nutrition
Copyright Statement: © Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018. The final publication is available at Springer via https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00394-018-1874-z
Keywords: Coffee
Cohort
EPIC
Intake
Tea
Thyroid cancer
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Nutrition & Dietetics
Publication Status: Published online
Conference Place: Germany
Embargo Date: 2019-12-10
Online Publication Date: 2018-12-10
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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