Restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with low physical activity levels. A population based international study

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Title: Restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with low physical activity levels. A population based international study
Authors: Carsin, AE
Fuertes, E
Schaffner, E
Jarvis, D
Antó, JM
Heinrich, J
Bellisario, V
Svanes, C
Keidel, D
Imboden, M
Weyler, J
Nowak, D
Martinez-Moratalla, J
Gullón, JA
Sanchez Ramos, JL
Caviezel, S
Beckmeyer-Borowko, A
Raherison, C
Pin, I
Demoly, P
Cerveri, I
Accordini, S
Gislason, T
Toren, K
Forsberg, B
Janson, C
Jogi, R
Emtner, M
Gómez Real, F
Raza, W
Leynaert, B
Pascual, S
Guerra, S
Dharmage, SC
Probst-Hensch, N
Garcia-Aymerich, J
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Introduction: Restrictive spirometry pattern is an under-recognised disorder with a poor morbidity and mortality prognosis. We compared physical activity levels between adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern and with normal spirometry. Methods: Restrictive spirometry pattern was defined as a having post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ≥ Lower Limit of Normal and a FVC<80% predicted in two population-based studies (ECRHS-III and SAPALDIA3). Physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The odds of having low physical activity (<1st study-specific tertile) was evaluated using adjusted logistic regression models. Results: Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern (n = 280/4721 in ECRHS, n = 143/3570 in SAPALDIA) reported lower levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry (median of 1770 vs 2253 MET·min/week in ECRHS, and 3519 vs 3945 MET·min/week in SAPALDIA). Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low physical activity (meta-analysis odds ratio: 1.41 [95%CI 1.07–1.86]) than those with a normal spirometry. Obesity, respiratory symptoms, co-morbidities and previous physical activity levels did not fully explain this finding. Conclusion: Adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry. These results highlight the need to identify and act on this understudied but prevalent condition.
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2019
Date of Acceptance: 28-Nov-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/66590
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2018.11.017
ISSN: 0954-6111
Start Page: 116
End Page: 123
Journal / Book Title: Respiratory Medicine
Volume: 146
Copyright Statement: © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Sponsor/Funder: Medical Research Council (MRC)
Commission of the European Communities
Funder's Grant Number: G0901214
633212
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
Respiratory System
Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
Restrictive spirometry pattern
Body mass index
Epidemiology
Lung function
Physical activity
LUNG-FUNCTION
ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE
NATIONAL-HEALTH
MORTALITY
DISEASE
IMPAIRMENT
DISORDER
EVENTS
RISK
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Embargo Date: 2019-12-15
Online Publication Date: 2018-12-15
Appears in Collections:Infectious Disease Epidemiology
National Heart and Lung Institute
Faculty of Medicine



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