Musculoskeletal pain in adults born preterm: evidence from two birth cohort studies

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Title: Musculoskeletal pain in adults born preterm: evidence from two birth cohort studies
Authors: Evensen, KAI
Tikanmäki, M
Heinonen, K
Matinolli, H-M
Sipola-Leppänen, M
Lano, A
Wolke, D
Vääräsmäki, M
Eriksson, JG
Andersson, S
Järvelin, M-R
Hovi, P
Räikkönen, K
Kajantie, E
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background Individuals born preterm are at risk of later developmental problems and long‐term morbidities. There is conflicting evidence regarding musculoskeletal pain in young adulthood. We investigated the prevalence of self‐reported musculoskeletal pain in young adults born across the range of preterm birth compared with a term‐born reference group. Methods From two Finnish birth cohorts, 184 individuals born early preterm (<34 weeks), 350 late preterm (34 to <37 weeks) and 641 at term completed a self‐report questionnaire of musculoskeletal pain at mean age 24.1 (SD: 1.4) years. Group differences were examined by logistic regression models adjusting for sex, age and cohort (Model 1), potential early life confounders (Model 2) and lifestyle factors related to physical (Model 3) and mental health (Model 4). Results The late preterm group had lower odds for reporting neck pain (0.73; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56–0.96), which was further reduced when adjusting for early life confounders and lifestyle factors (Model 4). Odds for reporting peripheral pain were 0.69 (95% CI: 0.48–0.99, Model 4) in the early preterm group. The odds for reporting any pain, shoulder, low back or widespread pain did not differ significantly between groups, although odds for reporting widespread pain were 0.77 (95% CI: 0.58–1.03, Model 4) in the late preterm group. Conclusions We did not find evidence of increased prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adults born early or late preterm. In contrast, our results suggest that adults born preterm have a slightly lower risk of reporting musculoskeletal pain, also when we adjusted for lifestyle factors. Significance Young adults born preterm do not have increased rates of musculoskeletal pain. Our findings rather suggest that these rates may be slightly lower than among those born at term.
Issue Date: Mar-2019
Date of Acceptance: 28-Sep-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/65207
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ejp.1320
ISSN: 1532-2149
Publisher: Wiley
Start Page: 461
End Page: 471
Journal / Book Title: European Journal of Pain
Volume: 23
Issue: 3
Copyright Statement: © 2018 European Pain Federation ‐ EFIC®. This is the accepted version of the following article, which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ejp.1320
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Anesthesiology
Clinical Neurology
Neurosciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
LONG-TERM IMPACT
YOUNG-ADULTS
CHILDREN BORN
WEIGHT INFANTS
FOLLOW-UP
HEALTH
AGE
SENSITIVITY
PREMATURE
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Musculoskeletal Pain
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Humans
Logistic Models
Cohort Studies
Gestational Age
Adult
Infant, Newborn
Finland
Female
Male
Young Adult
Self Report
Musculoskeletal Pain
Surveys and Questionnaires
Anesthesiology
1103 Clinical Sciences
1109 Neurosciences
1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2018-10-05
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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