Reproducibility of the Oxford Classification of IgA nephropathy, impact of biopsy scoring on treatment allocation and clinical relevance of disagreements: evidence from the VALIGA study cohort

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Title: Reproducibility of the Oxford Classification of IgA nephropathy, impact of biopsy scoring on treatment allocation and clinical relevance of disagreements: evidence from the VALIGA study cohort
Authors: Bellur, S
Roberts, ISD
Troyanov, S
Royal, V
Coppo, R
Cook, HT
Cattran, D
Terroba, YA
Asunis, AM
Bajema, I
Bertoni, E
Bruijn, JA
Cannata-Ortiz, P
Casartelli, D
Di Palma, AM
Ferrario, F
Fortunato, M
Furci, L
Gakiopoulou, H
Ljubanovic, DG
Giannakakis, K
Gomà, M
Gröne, H-J
Gutiérrez, E
Haider, SA
Honsova, E
Ioachim, E
Karkoszka, H
Kipgen, D
Maldyk, J
Mazzucco, G
Orhan, D
Ozluk, Y
Pantzaki, A
Perkowska-Ptasinska, A
Riispere, Z
Soderberg, M
Steenbergen, E
Stoppacciaro, A
Sundelin, B
Tardanico, R
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Objective & Methods: The VALIGA study investigated the utility of the Oxford Classification of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) in 1147 patients from 13 European countries. Biopsies were scored by local pathologists followed by central review in Oxford. We had two distinct objectives: to assess how closely pathology findings were associated with the decision to give corticosteroid/immunosuppressive treatments (CS/IS), and to determine the impact of differences in MEST-C scoring between central and local pathologists on the clinical value of the Oxford Classification. We tested for each lesion the associations between the type of agreement (local and central pathologists scoring absent, local present-central absent, local absent-central present, both scoring present) with the initial clinical assessment, as well as long-term outcomes in those patients who did not receive CS/IS. Results: All glomerular lesions (M, E, C and S) assessed by local pathologists were independently associated with the decision to administer CS/IS therapy whilst the severity of tubulointerstitial lesions was not. Reproducibility between local and central pathologists was moderate for S (segmental sclerosis) and T (tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis), and poor for M (mesangial hypercellularity), E (endocapillary hypercellularity), and C (crescents). Local pathologists found statistically more of each lesion, except for the S lesion, which was more frequent with central review. Disagreements were more likely to occur when the proportion of glomeruli affected was low. The M lesion, assessed by central pathologists, correlated better with the severity of the disease at presentation and discriminated better with outcomes. By contrast, the E lesion, evaluated by local pathologists, correlated better with the clinical presentation and outcomes compared to central review. Both C and S lesions, when discordant between local and central pathologists, had a clinical phenotype intermediate to double absent lesions (milder disease) and double present (more severe). Conclusion: We conclude that differences in the scoring of MEST-C criteria between local pathologists and central reviewer have a significant impact on the prognostic value of the Oxford Classification. Since the decision to offer immunosuppressive therapy in this cohort was intimately associated with the MEST-C score, this study indicates a need for a more detailed guidance for pathologists in the scoring of IgAN biopsies.
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2018
Date of Acceptance: 18-Sep-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/64953
ISSN: 0931-0509
Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
Journal / Book Title: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Copyright Statement: This paper is embargoed for 12 months after publication.
Keywords: 1103 Clinical Sciences
Urology & Nephrology
Publication Status: Accepted
Appears in Collections:Department of Medicine
Faculty of Medicine



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