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Improved tropical cyclone intensity forecasts by assimilating coastal surface currents in an idealized study

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Title: Improved tropical cyclone intensity forecasts by assimilating coastal surface currents in an idealized study
Authors: Li, YI
Toumi, R
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: High‐frequency (HF) radars can provide high‐resolution and frequent ocean surface currents observations during tropical cyclone (TC) landfall. We describe the first assimilation of such potential observations using idealized twin experiments with and without these observations. The data assimilation system consists of the Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter and a coupled ocean‐atmosphere model. In this system, synthetic HF radar‐observed coastal currents are assimilated, and the 24‐, 48‐ and 72‐hr forecast performances are examined for TCs with various intensities, sizes, and translation speeds. Assimilating coastal surface currents improves the intensity forecast. The errors of the maximum wind speed reduce by 2.7 (33%) and 1.9 m/s (60%) in the 72‐hr forecast and 2.8 (40%) and 1.4 m/s (62%) in the 48‐hr forecast, for Category 4 and 2 cyclones, respectively. These improvements are similar to the current operational TC forecast errors, so that assimilating HF radar observations could be a substantial benefit.
Issue Date: 28-Sep-2018
Date of Acceptance: 11-Sep-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/64684
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2018GL079677
ISSN: 0094-8276
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
Start Page: 10019
End Page: 10026
Journal / Book Title: Geophysical Research Letters
Volume: 45
Issue: 18
Copyright Statement: ©2018. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
Sponsor/Funder: Met Office
Funder's Grant Number: P100212
Keywords: MD Multidisciplinary
Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2018-09-17
Appears in Collections:Space and Atmospheric Physics
Physics
Faculty of Natural Sciences



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