Timing of eating across ten European countries - results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study

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Title: Timing of eating across ten European countries - results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study
Authors: Huseinovic, E
Winkvist, A
Freisling, H
Slimani, N
Boeing, H
Buckland, G
Schwingshackl, L
Olsen, A
Tjønneland, A
Stepien, M
Boutron-Ruault, M-C
Mancini, F
Artaud, F
Kühn, T
Katzke, V
Trichopoulou, A
Naska, A
Orfanos, P
Tumino, R
Masala, G
Krogh, V
Santucci de Magistris, M
Ocké, MC
Brustad, M
Jensen, TE
Skeie, G
Rodríguez-Barranco, M
Huerta, JM
Ardanaz, E
Quirós, JR
Jakszyn, P
Sonestedt, E
Ericson, U
Wennberg, M
Key, TJ
Aune, D
Riboli, E
Weiderpass, E
Bertéus Forslund, H
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To examine timing of eating across ten European countries. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study using standardized 24 h diet recalls collected during 1995-2000. Eleven predefined food consumption occasions were assessed during the recall interview. We present time of consumption of meals and snacks as well as the later:earlier energy intake ratio, with earlier and later intakes defined as 06.00-14.00 and 15.00-24.00 hours, respectively. Type III tests were used to examine associations of sociodemographic, lifestyle and health variables with timing of energy intake. SETTING: Ten Western European countries. SUBJECTS: In total, 22 985 women and 13 035 men aged 35-74 years (n 36 020). RESULTS: A south-north gradient was observed for timing of eating, with later consumption of meals and snacks in Mediterranean countries compared with Central and Northern European countries. However, the energy load was reversed, with the later:earlier energy intake ratio ranging from 0·68 (France) to 1·39 (Norway) among women, and from 0·71 (Greece) to 1·35 (the Netherlands) among men. Among women, country, age, education, marital status, smoking, day of recall and season were all independently associated with timing of energy intake (all P<0·05). Among men, the corresponding variables were country, age, education, smoking, physical activity, BMI and day of recall (all P<0·05). CONCLUSIONS: We found pronounced differences in timing of eating across Europe, with later meal timetables but greater energy load earlier during the day in Mediterranean countries compared with Central and Northern European countries.
Issue Date: Feb-2019
Date of Acceptance: 6-Aug-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/63821
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980018002288
ISSN: 1368-9800
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Start Page: 324
End Page: 335
Journal / Book Title: Public Health Nutrition
Volume: 22
Issue: 2
Copyright Statement: © 2018 The authors. This paper has been accepted for publication and will appear in a revised form, subsequent to peer-review and/or editorial input by Cambridge University Press.
Sponsor/Funder: Commission of the European Communities
Funder's Grant Number: SP23-CT-2005-006438
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Nutrition & Dietetics
Meal patterns
Chrono-nutrition
Diurnal eating
Meals
Snacks
Standardization
24 h diet recall
EPIC
BODY-MASS INDEX
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
MEAL PATTERNS
FOOD-INTAKE
DIET QUALITY
WEIGHT-LOSS
DISEASE
TIME
FREQUENCY
IMPACT
24 h diet recall
Chrono-nutrition
Diurnal eating
EPIC
Meal patterns
Meals
Snacks
Standardization
24 h diet recall
Chrono-nutrition
Diurnal eating
EPIC
Meal patterns
Meals
Snacks
Standardization
Nutrition & Dietetics
11 Medical and Health Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Conference Place: England
Online Publication Date: 2018-10-17
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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