Gel-mediated electrospray assembly of silica supraparticles for sustained drug delivery

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Title: Gel-mediated electrospray assembly of silica supraparticles for sustained drug delivery
Author(s): Ma, Y
Björnmalm, M
Wise, AK
Cortez-Jugo, C
Revalor, E
Ju, Y
Feeney, OM
Richardson, RT
Hanssen, E
Shepherd, RK
Porter, CJH
Caruso, F
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Supraparticles (SPs) composed of smaller colloidal particles provide a platform for the long-term, controlled release of therapeutics in biomedical applications. However, current synthesis methods used to achieve high drug loading and those involving biocompatible materials are often tedious and low throughput, thereby limiting the translation of SPs to diverse applications. Herein, we present a simple, effective, and automatable alginate-mediated electrospray technique for the assembly of robust spherical silica SPs (Si-SPs) for long-term (>4 months) drug delivery. The Si-SPs are composed of either porous or nonporous primary Si particles within a decomposable alginate matrix. The size and shape of the Si-SPs can be tailored by controlling the concentrations of alginate and silica primary particles used and key electrospraying parameters, such as flow rate, voltage, and collector distance. Furthermore, the performance (including drug loading kinetics, loading capacity, loading efficiency, and drug release) of the Si-SPs can be tuned by changing the porosity of the primary particles and through the retention or removal (via calcination) of the alginate matrix. The structure and morphology of the Si-SPs were characterized by electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity and degradability of the Si-SPs were also examined. Drug loading kinetics and loading capacity for six different types of Si-SPs, using a model protein drug (fluorescently labeled lysozyme), demonstrate that Si-SPs prepared from primary silica particles with large pores can load significant amounts of lysozyme (∼10 μg per SP) and exhibit sustained, long-term release of more than 150 days. Our experiments show that Si-SPs can be produced through a gel-mediated electrospray technique that is robust and automatable (important for clinical translation and commercialization) and that they present a promising platform for long-term drug delivery.
Publication Date: 19-Sep-2018
Date of Acceptance: 21-Aug-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/62237
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.8b10415
ISSN: 1944-8244
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Start Page: 31019
End Page: 31031
Journal / Book Title: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume: 10
Issue: 37
Copyright Statement: © 2018 American Chemical Society. This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.8b10415
Keywords: Science & Technology
Technology
Nanoscience & Nanotechnology
Materials Science, Multidisciplinary
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Materials Science
alginate
electrospray
silica supraparticles
porous silica
drug delivery
ELECTROSTATIC DROPLET GENERATION
NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR
ALGINATE BEADS
BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS
NANOPARTICLES
PARTICLES
RELEASE
SURFACE
MICROPARTICLES
LIQUIDS
alginate
drug delivery
electrospray
porous silica
silica supraparticles
alginate
drug delivery
electrospray
porous silica
silica supraparticles
0904 Chemical Engineering
0303 Macromolecular And Materials Chemistry
0306 Physical Chemistry (Incl. Structural)
Nanoscience & Nanotechnology
Publication Status: Published
Conference Place: United States
Embargo Date: 2019-09-07
Online Publication Date: 2018-09-07
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Engineering
Materials



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