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Prevalence and causes of vision loss in high-income countries and in Eastern and Central Europe in 2015: magnitude, temporal trends and projections

Title: Prevalence and causes of vision loss in high-income countries and in Eastern and Central Europe in 2015: magnitude, temporal trends and projections
Authors: Bourne, RRA
Jonas, JB
Bron, AM
Cicinelli, MV
Das, A
Flaxman, SR
Friedman, DS
Keeffe, JE
Kempen, JH
Leasher, J
Limburg, H
Naidoo, K
Pesudovs, K
Peto, T
Saadine, J
Silvester, AJ
Tahhan, N
Taylor, HR
Varma, R
Wong, TY
Resnikoff, S
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background Within a surveillance of the prevalence and causes of vision impairment in high-income regions and Central/Eastern Europe, we update figures through 2015 and forecast expected values in 2020. Methods Based on a systematic review of medical literature, prevalence of blindness, moderate and severe vision impairment (MSVI), mild vision impairment and presbyopia was estimated for 1990, 2010, 2015, and 2020. Results Age-standardised prevalence of blindness and MSVI for all ages decreased from 1990 to 2015 from 0.26% (0.10–0.46) to 0.15% (0.06–0.26) and from 1.74% (0.76–2.94) to 1.27% (0.55–2.17), respectively. In 2015, the number of individuals affected by blindness, MSVI and mild vision impairment ranged from 70 000, 630 000 and 610 000, respectively, in Australasia to 980 000, 7.46 million and 7.25 million, respectively, in North America and 1.16 million, 9.61 million and 9.47 million, respectively, in Western Europe. In 2015, cataract was the most common cause for blindness, followed by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, uncorrected refractive error, diabetic retinopathy and cornea-related disorders, with declining burden from cataract and AMD over time. Uncorrected refractive error was the leading cause of MSVI. Conclusions While continuing to advance control of cataract and AMD as the leading causes of blindness remains a high priority, overcoming barriers to uptake of refractive error services would address approximately half of the MSVI burden. New data on burden of presbyopia identify this entity as an important public health problem in this population. Additional research on better treatments, better implementation with existing tools and ongoing surveillance of the problem is needed.
Issue Date: 1-May-2018
Date of Acceptance: 24-Feb-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/61479
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2017-311258
ISSN: 0007-1161
Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP
Start Page: 575
End Page: 585
Journal / Book Title: BRITISH JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY
Volume: 102
Issue: 5
Copyright Statement: © 2018 The Author(s). This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ophthalmology
OPEN-ANGLE GLAUCOMA
MACULAR DEGENERATION
VISUAL IMPAIRMENT
GLOBAL PREVALENCE
BLINDNESS
RANIBIZUMAB
DISTANCE
INDIA
epidemiology
glaucoma
public health
Vision Loss Expert Group of the Global Burden of Disease Study
1103 Clinical Sciences
1113 Ophthalmology And Optometry
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Ophthalmology & Optometry
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2018-03-15
Appears in Collections:Mathematics
Statistics
Faculty of Natural Sciences



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