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Relations between dairy product intake and blood pressure: the INTERnational study on MAcro/micronutrients and blood Pressure

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Title: Relations between dairy product intake and blood pressure: the INTERnational study on MAcro/micronutrients and blood Pressure
Authors: Aljuraiban, GS
Stamler, J
Chan, Q
Van Horn, L
Daviglus, ML
Elliott, P
Oude Griep, LM
INTERMAP Research Group
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence suggests that low-fat dairy consumption may lower risk of hypertension. Dairy products may be distinctly linked to health, because of differences in nutritional composition, but little is known about specific nutrients that contribute to the dairy-blood pressure (BP) association, nor to underlying kidney function. METHODS: We examined cross-sectional associations to BP of dairy product intakes, total and by type, from the INTERnational study on MAcro/micronutrients and blood Pressure (INTERMAP) including 2694 participants aged 40-59 years from the UK and the USA. Eight BP, four 24-h dietary recalls and two 24-h urine samples were collected during four visits. Linear regression models adjusted for lifestyle/dietary factors to estimate BP differences per 2SD higher intakes of total-and-individual-types of dairy were calculated. RESULTS: Multivariable linear regression coefficients were estimated and pooled. In contrast to total and whole-fat dairy, each 195 g/1000 kcal (2SD) greater low-fat dairy intake was associated with a lower SBP -2.31 mmHg and DBP -2.27 mmHg. Significant associations attenuated with adjustment for dietary phosphorus, calcium, and lactose, but strengthened with urinary calcium adjustment. Stratification by median albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR; high ACR indicates impaired kidney function) showed strong associations between low-fat dairy and BP in participants with low ACR (SBP: -3.66; DBP: -2.15 mmHg), with no association in participants with high ACR. CONCLUSION: Low-fat dairy consumption was associated with lower BP, especially among participants with low ACR. Dairy-rich nutrients including phosphorus and calcium may have contributed to the beneficial associations with BP.
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2018
Date of Acceptance: 8-Apr-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/60743
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000001779
ISSN: 0263-6352
Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Start Page: 2049
End Page: 2058
Journal / Book Title: Journal of Hypertension
Volume: 36
Issue: 10
Copyright Statement: © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.
Sponsor/Funder: Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
University Of Northwestern
National Institutes of Health
Medical Research Council (MRC)
National Institute for Health Research
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Medical Research Council (MRC)
UK DRI Ltd
National Institute for Health Research
Funder's Grant Number: RDF03
1 RO1 HL50490
60024563 ICL
MR/L01341X/1
RTJ6219303-1
MR/L01632X/1
MR/L01632X/1
4050641385
NF-SI-0611-10136
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Peripheral Vascular Disease
Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
albumin-creatinine ratio
blood pressure
dairy products
dietary factors
URINARY CALCIUM EXCRETION
CHRONIC KIDNEY-DISEASE
RISK-FACTORS
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
CHEESE CONSUMPTION
METABOLIC SYNDROME
FOOD-CONSUMPTION
DIETARY PATTERNS
SATURATED FAT
GLOBAL BURDEN
INTERMAP Research Group
1103 Clinical Sciences
1102 Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology
Cardiovascular System & Hematology
Publication Status: Published
Conference Place: England
Online Publication Date: 2018-06-20
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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