Functional microbiomics: evaluation of gut microbiota-bile acid metabolism interactions in health and disease

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Title: Functional microbiomics: evaluation of gut microbiota-bile acid metabolism interactions in health and disease
Authors: Mullish, BH
Pechlivanis, A
Barker, GF
Thursz, MR
Marchesi, JR
McDonald, JAK
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: There is an ever-increasing recognition that bile acids are not purely simple surfactant molecules that aid in lipid digestion, but are a family of molecules contributing to a diverse range of key systemic functions in the host. It is now also understood that the specific composition of the bile acid milieu within the host is related to the expression and activity of bacterially-derived enzymes within the gastrointestinal tract, as such creating a direct link between the physiology of the host and the gut microbiota. Coupled to the knowledge that perturbation of the structure and/or function of the gut microbiota may contribute to the pathogenesis of a range of diseases, there is a high level of interest in the potential for manipulation of the gut microbiota-host bile acid axis as a novel approach to therapeutics. Much of the growing understanding of the biology of this area reflects the recent development and refinement of a range of novel techniques; this study applies a number of those techniques to the analysis of human samples, aiming to illustrate their strengths, drawbacks and biological significance at all stages. Specifically, we used microbial profiling (using 16S rRNA gene sequencing), bile acid profiling (using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry), bsh and baiCD qPCR, and a BSH enzyme activity assay to demonstrate differences in the gut microbiota and bile metabolism in stool samples from healthy and antibiotic-exposed individuals.
Editors: Li, JV
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2018
Date of Acceptance: 22-Apr-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/59260
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2018.04.028
ISSN: 1046-2023
Publisher: Elsevier
Start Page: 49
End Page: 58
Journal / Book Title: Methods
Volume: 149
Copyright Statement: © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.
Sponsor/Funder: Medical Research Council
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Funder's Grant Number: MR/R00875/1
MR/R000875/1
RDA02
RDA27
RDA27
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biochemical Research Methods
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Microbiota
Metabonome
Bile
Antibiotics
16S rRNA gene sequencing
qPCR
SALT HYDROLASE
ENZYME-ACTIVITIES
FECAL SAMPLES
HUMAN FECES
R-PACKAGE
SPECTROMETRY
ASSIGNMENT
PROFILES
STRATEGY
BACTERIA
16S rRNA gene sequencing
Antibiotics
Bile
Metabonome
Microbiota
qPCR
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bile Acids and Salts
Feces
Female
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Feces
Humans
Bile Acids and Salts
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Adult
Aged
Middle Aged
Female
Male
Healthy Volunteers
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
1103 Clinical Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2018-04-26
Appears in Collections:Division of Surgery
Faculty of Medicine



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