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The use of sequential mark-release-recapture experiments to estimate population size, survival and dispersal of male mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae complex in Bana, a west African humid savannah village

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Title: The use of sequential mark-release-recapture experiments to estimate population size, survival and dispersal of male mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae complex in Bana, a west African humid savannah village
Authors: Epopa, PS
Millogo, AA
Collins, CM
North, A
Tripet, F
Benedict, MQ
Diabate, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background: Vector control is a major component of the malaria control strategy. The increasing spread of insecticide resistance has encouraged the development of new tools such as genetic control which use releases of modified male mosquitoes. The use of male mosquitoes as part of a control strategy requires an improved understanding of male mosquito biology, including the factors influencing their survival and dispersal, as well as the ability to accurately estimate the size of a target mosquito population. This study was designed to determine the seasonal variation in population size via repeated mark-release-recapture experiments and to estimate the survival and dispersal of male mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae complex in a small west African village. Methods: Mark-release-recapture experiments were carried out in Bana Village over two consecutive years, during the wet and the dry seasons. For each experiment, around 5000 (3407–5273) adult male Anopheles coluzzii mosquitoes were marked using three different colour dye powders (red, blue and green) and released in three different locations in the village (centre, edge and outside). Mosquitoes were recaptured at sites spread over the village for seven consecutive days following the releases. Three different capture methods were used: clay pots, pyrethroid spray catches and swarm sampling. Results: Swarm sampling was the most productive method for recapturing male mosquitoes in the field. Population size and survival were estimated by Bayesian analyses of the Fisher-Ford model, revealing an about 10-fold increase in population size estimates between the end of dry season (10,000–50,000) to the wet season (100,000–500,000). There were no detectable seasonal effects on mosquito survival, suggesting that factors other than weather may play an important role. Mosquito dispersal ranged from 40 to 549 m over the seven days of each study and was not influenced by the season, but mainly by the release location, which explained more than 44% of the variance in net dispersal distance. Conclusion: This study clearly shows that male-based MRR experiments can be used to estimate some parameters of wild male populations such as population size, survival, and dispersal and to estimate the spatial patterns of movement in a given locality.
Issue Date: 7-Aug-2017
Date of Acceptance: 26-Jul-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/58873
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-017-2310-6
ISSN: 1756-3305
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal / Book Title: Parasites & Vectors
Volume: 10
Copyright Statement: © The Author(s) 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Parasitology
Tropical Medicine
Mark-release-recapture
Anopheles coluzzii
Population size
Survival
Dispersal
Male mosquitoes
Genetic control
ENGINEERED MALE MOSQUITOS
TRANSGENIC MOSQUITOS
VECTOR CONTROL
GENE DRIVE
CLAY POTS
CULICIDAE
DIPTERA
TRANSMISSION
STRATEGIES
MIGRATION
Africa, Western
Animal Distribution
Animals
Anopheles
Bayes Theorem
Communicable Disease Control
Grassland
Humidity
Insecticide Resistance
Malaria
Male
Mosquito Vectors
Population Density
Seasons
Sex Factors
1108 Medical Microbiology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Mycology & Parasitology
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: ARTN 376
Online Publication Date: 2017-08-07
Appears in Collections:Centre for Environmental Policy
Faculty of Natural Sciences



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