Altmetric

Interprofessional Communication of Clinicians Using a Mobile Phone App: A Randomized Crossover Trial Using Simulated Patients

File Description SizeFormat 
fc-xsltGalley-4854-80803-13-PB.pdfPublished version12.8 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Interprofessional Communication of Clinicians Using a Mobile Phone App: A Randomized Crossover Trial Using Simulated Patients
Authors: Patel, B
Johnston, M
Cookson, N
King, D
Arora, S
Darzi, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background: Most hospitals use paging systems as the principal communication system, despite general dissatisfaction by end users. To this end, we developed an app-based communication system (called Hark) to facilitate and improve the quality of interpersonal communication. Objective: The objectives of our study were (1) to assess the quality of information transfer using pager- and app-based (Hark) communication systems, (2) to determine whether using mobile phone apps for escalation of care results in additional delays in communication, and (3) to determine how end users perceive mobile phone apps as an alternative to pagers. Methods: We recruited junior (postgraduate year 1 and 2) doctors and nurses from a range of specialties and randomly assigned them to 2 groups who used either a pager device or the mobile phone-based Hark app. We asked nurses to hand off simulated patients while doctors were asked to receive handoff information using these devices. The quality of information transfer, time taken to respond to messages, and users’ satisfaction with each device was recorded. Each participant used both devices with a 2-week washout period in between uses. Results: We recruited 22 participants (13 nurses, 9 doctors). The quality of the referrals made by nurses was significantly better when using Hark (Hark median 118, range 100–121 versus pager median 77, range 39–104; P=.001). Doctors responded to messages using Hark more quickly than when responding to pagers, although this difference was not statistically significant (Hark mean 86.6 seconds, SD 96.2 versus pager mean 136.5 seconds, SD 201.0; P=.12). Users rated Hark as significantly better on 11 of the 18 criteria of an information transfer device (P<.05) These included “enhances interprofessional efficiency,” “results in less disturbance,” “performed desired functions reliably,” and “allows me to clearly transfer information.” Conclusions: Hark improved the quality of transfer of information about simulated patients and was rated by users as more effective and efficient, and less distracting than pagers. Using this device did not result in delay in patient care.
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2016
Date of Acceptance: 4-Jan-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/58769
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.2196/jmir.4854
ISSN: 1438-8871
Publisher: JMIR PUBLICATIONS, INC
Journal / Book Title: JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH
Volume: 18
Issue: 4
Copyright Statement: ©Bhavesh Patel, Maximilian Johnston, Natalie Cookson, Dominic King, Sonal Arora, Ara Darzi. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 06.04.2016. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
Sponsor/Funder: National Institute for Health Research
Funder's Grant Number: NF-SI-0510-10186
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Medical Informatics
communication
mobile phone
pager
applications
apps
escalation of care
simulation
CARE
ENVIRONMENT
SURGERY
SMARTPHONE
ESCALATION
FAILURE
RESCUE
IMPACT
INTERVENTIONS
INFORMATION
08 Information And Computing Sciences
11 Medical And Health Sciences
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: ARTN e79
Appears in Collections:Division of Surgery
Faculty of Medicine



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Creative Commonsx