UK medical students' perceptions, attitudes, and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers

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Title: UK medical students' perceptions, attitudes, and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers
Author(s): Rouhani, MJ
Burleigh, EJ
Hobbis, C
Dunford, C
Osman, NI
Gan, C
Gibbons, NB
Ahmed, HU
Miah, S
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background: We aimed to determine UK medical students’ perceptions and attitudes and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during the academic year 2015–2016. An online questionnaire was distributed to 2,349 final-year students from 10 UK medical schools. Participants were asked to complete a 5-point Likert scale on their current perceptions, attitudes, and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers. They were also asked to self-rate their leadership competences set by the Medical Leadership Competency Framework and to rate the quality of management and leadership training they received from their medical school. Results: In total, we received 114 complete responses. Only 7.9% of respondents were in agreement (strongly agree or agree) when asked whether they felt they were well informed about what a managerial position in medicine entails. When asked whether clinicians should influence managerial decisions within a clinical setting, 94.7% of respondents were in agreement with the statement. About 85% of respondents were in agreement that it is important for clinicians to have managerial or leadership responsibilities, with 63.2% of students in agreement that they would have liked more management or leadership training during medical school. Over half the respondents rated their management and leadership training they received during medical school as “very poor” or “poor” (54.4%). Conclusion: Our study suggests that UK medical students have an appetite for management and leadership training and appreciate its importance but feel that the training they are receiving is poor. This suggests that there is a gap between the demand for management and leadership training and the quality of training supplied by UK medical schools.
Publication Date: 16-Feb-2018
Date of Acceptance: 4-Dec-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/57614
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S151436
ISSN: 1179-7258
Publisher: Dove Medical Press
Start Page: 119
End Page: 124
Journal / Book Title: Advances in Medical Education and Practice
Volume: 9
Copyright Statement: © 2018 Rouhani et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.
Sponsor/Funder: Wellcome Trust
Funder's Grant Number: 204998/Z/16/Z
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
medical leadership
clinician managers
medical student
training
EDUCATION
PERSPECTIVES
clinician managers
medical leadership
medical student
training
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
medical leadership
clinician managers
medical student
training
EDUCATION
PERSPECTIVES
1302 Curriculum And Pedagogy
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Division of Surgery
Faculty of Medicine



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