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PD-L1.

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Gene of the month PD-L1_16Oct17.docxAccepted version70.27 kBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Title: PD-L1.
Authors: Kythreotou, A
Siddique, A
Mauri, FA
Bower, M
Pinato, DJ
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) is the principal ligand of programmed death 1 (PD-1), a coinhibitory receptor that can be constitutively expressed or induced in myeloid, lymphoid, normal epithelial cells and in cancer. Under physiological conditions, the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction is essential in the development of immune tolerance preventing excessive immune cell activity that can lead to tissue destruction and autoimmunity. PD-L1 expression is an immune evasion mechanism exploited by various malignancies and is generally associated with poorer prognosis. PD-L1 expression is also suggested as a predictive biomarker of response to anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies; however, contradictory evidence exists as to its role across histotypes. Over the years, anti-PD-1/PD-L1 agents have gained momentum as novel anticancer therapeutics, by inducing durable tumour regression in numerous malignancies including metastatic lung cancer, melanoma and many others. In this review, we discuss the immunobiology of PD-L1, with a particular focus on its clinical significance in malignancy.
Issue Date: 2-Nov-2017
Date of Acceptance: 19-Oct-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/55570
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2017-204853
ISSN: 1472-4146
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Start Page: 189
End Page: 194
Journal / Book Title: Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume: 71
Copyright Statement: © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
Sponsor/Funder: ViiV Healthcare UK Limited
Funder's Grant Number: N/A
Keywords: cancer
immunology
oncogenes
1103 Clinical Sciences
Pathology
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Division of Surgery
Division of Cancer
Faculty of Medicine



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