Healthcare worker influenza vaccination and sickness absence - an ecological study.

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Title: Healthcare worker influenza vaccination and sickness absence - an ecological study.
Authors: Pereira, M
Williams, S
Restrick, L
Cullinan, P
Hopkinson, NS
London Respiratory Network
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Although Influenza vaccination is recommended for healthcare workers, vaccination rates in UK healthcare workers are only around 50%. We investigated the association between NHS sickness absence rates (using data from Health and Social Care Information Centre quarterly reports), staff vaccination rates and influenza vaccine efficacy (from Public Health England), influenza deaths (from the Office of National Statistics) and staff satisfaction (from www.NHSstaffsurveys.com). Data from 223 healthcare trusts covered approximately 800,000 staff in each of four influenza seasons from 2011; overall staff sickness rate was roughly 4.5%. Annual vaccination rates varied between 44% and 54%. Higher NHS trust vaccination rates were associated with reduced sickness absence (β = -0.425 [95% CI -0.658 to -0.192], p<0.001). Thus, a 10% increase in vaccination rate would be associated with a 10% fall in sickness absence rate. Influenza vaccination for NHS staff is associated with reduced sickness absence rates.
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2017
Date of Acceptance: 1-Dec-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/54984
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.7861/clinmedicine.17-6-484
ISSN: 1470-2118
Publisher: Royal College of Physicians
Start Page: 484
End Page: 489
Journal / Book Title: Clinical Medicine
Volume: 17
Issue: 6
Copyright Statement: © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Healthcare worker
influenza
occupational health
vaccination
London Respiratory Network
Healthcare worker
influenza
occupational health
vaccination
1103 Clinical Sciences
General Clinical Medicine
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:National Heart and Lung Institute
Airway Disease
Faculty of Medicine



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