Traffic-related air pollution and congenital anomalies in Barcelona

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Title: Traffic-related air pollution and congenital anomalies in Barcelona
Authors: Schembari, A
Nieuwenhuijsen, MJ
Salvador, J
De Nazelle, A
Cirach, M
Dadvand, P
Beelen, R
Hoek, G
Basagana, X
Vrijheid, M
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background: A recent meta-analysis suggested evidence for an effect of exposure to ambient air pollutants on risk of certain congenital heart defects. However, few studies have investigated the effects of traffic-related air pollutants with sufficient spatial accuracy. Objectives: We estimated associations between congenital anomalies and exposure to traffic-related air pollution in Barcelona, Spain. Method: Cases with nonchromosomal anomalies (n = 2,247) and controls (n = 2,991) were selected from the Barcelona congenital anomaly register during 1994–2006. Land use regression models from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), were applied to residential addresses at birth to estimate spatial exposure to nitrogen oxides and dioxide (NOx, NO2), particulate matter with diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), 10–2.5 μm (PMcoarse), ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), and PM2.5 absorbance. Spatial estimates were adjusted for temporal trends using data from routine monitoring stations for weeks 3–8 of each pregnancy. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for 18 congenital anomaly groups associated with an interquartile-range (IQR) increase in exposure estimates. Results: In spatial and spatiotemporal exposure models, we estimated statistically significant associations between an IQR increase in NO2 (12.2 μg/m3) and coarctation of the aorta (ORspatiotemporal = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.31) and digestive system defects (ORspatiotemporal = 1.11; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.23), and between an IQR increase in PMcoarse (3.6 μg/m3) and abdominal wall defects (ORspatiotemporal = 1.93; 95% CI: 1.37, 2.73). Other statistically significant increased and decreased ORs were estimated based on the spatial model only or the spatiotemporal model only, but not both. Conclusions: Our results overall do not indicate an association between traffic-related air pollution and most groups of congenital anomalies. Findings for coarctation of the aorta are consistent with those of the previous meta-analysis.
Issue Date: 1-Mar-2014
Date of Acceptance: 1-Mar-2014
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/54432
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306802
ISSN: 0091-6765
Publisher: The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Start Page: 317
End Page: 323
Journal / Book Title: Environmental Health Perspectives
Volume: 122
Issue: 3
Copyright Statement: Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP) is an open-access publisher. All original content published in the journal is in the public domain and may be accessed and read freely by all interested users.
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Toxicology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
USE REGRESSION-MODELS
SAN-JOAQUIN VALLEY
BIRTH-DEFECTS
ESCAPE PROJECT
HEART-DEFECTS
MATERNAL EXPOSURE
PM2.5 ABSORBENCY
PREGNANT-WOMEN
COHORT
RISK
Adult
Air Pollutants
Cities
Congenital Abnormalities
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Nitrogen Oxides
Particulate Matter
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Seasons
Spain
Vehicle Emissions
Young Adult
Humans
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Nitrogen Oxides
Air Pollutants
Logistic Models
Cities
Seasons
Vehicle Emissions
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring
Pregnancy
Adult
Infant, Newborn
Spain
Female
Male
Particulate Matter
Congenital Abnormalities
Young Adult
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Toxicology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
USE REGRESSION-MODELS
SAN-JOAQUIN VALLEY
BIRTH-DEFECTS
ESCAPE PROJECT
HEART-DEFECTS
MATERNAL EXPOSURE
PM2.5 ABSORBENCY
PREGNANT-WOMEN
COHORT
RISK
11 Medical And Health Sciences
05 Environmental Sciences
Toxicology
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Centre for Environmental Policy
Faculty of Natural Sciences



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