Graphene-edge dielectrophoretic tweezers for trapping of biomolecules

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Title: Graphene-edge dielectrophoretic tweezers for trapping of biomolecules
Authors: Barik, A
Zhang, Y
Grassi, R
Paulose Nadappuram, B
Edel, JB
Low, T
Koester, SJ
Oh, SH
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: The many unique properties of graphene, such as the tunable optical, electrical, and plasmonic response make it ideally suited for applications such as biosensing. As with other surface-based biosensors, however, the performance is limited by the diffusive transport of target molecules to the surface. Here we show that atomically sharp edges of monolayer graphene can generate singular electrical field gradients for trapping biomolecules via dielectrophoresis. Graphene-edge dielectrophoresis pushes the physical limit of gradient-force-based trapping by creating atomically sharp tweezers. We have fabricated locally backgated devices with an 8-nm-thick HfO2 dielectric layer and chemical-vapor-deposited graphene to generate 10× higher gradient forces as compared to metal electrodes. We further demonstrate near-100% position-controlled particle trapping at voltages as low as 0.45 V with nanodiamonds, nanobeads, and DNA from bulk solution within seconds. This trapping scheme can be seamlessly integrated with sensors utilizing graphene as well as other two-dimensional materials.
Issue Date: 30-Nov-2017
Date of Acceptance: 5-Oct-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/54416
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-01635-9
ISSN: 2041-1723
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Journal / Book Title: Nature Communications
Volume: 8
Copyright Statement: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/4.0/. © The Author(s) 2017
Keywords: MD Multidisciplinary
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: 1867
Appears in Collections:Chemistry
Faculty of Natural Sciences



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