A cross-sectional investigation into the occupational and socio-demographic characteristics of British police force employees reporting a dietary pattern associated with cardiometabolic risk: Findings from the Airwave Health Monitoring Study

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Title: A cross-sectional investigation into the occupational and socio-demographic characteristics of British police force employees reporting a dietary pattern associated with cardiometabolic risk: Findings from the Airwave Health Monitoring Study
Authors: Gibson, R
Frost, G
Chan, Q
Elliott, P
Singh, D
Eriksen, R
Heard, A
Vergnaud, AC
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Purpose The aims of this study were to (1) determine the association between diet quality using the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score and cardiometabolic risk in a British working population and (2) identify employee characteristics associated with reporting a poorer quality dietary pattern. Methods British police employees enrolled (2007–2012) into the Airwave Health Monitoring Study (n = 5527) were included for sex-specific cross-sectional analyses. Dietary intakes were measured using 7-day food records. DASH score was calculated to determine diet quality. Logistic regression evaluated associations between (1) diet quality and increased cardiometabolic risk (defined as ≥ 3 risk markers: dyslipidaemia, elevated blood pressure, waist circumference, CRP or HbA1c), and (2) poor diet quality (lowest fifth of DASH score distribution) and employee characteristics. Results Employees recording a poor diet quality had greater odds (OR) of increased cardiometabolic risk independent of established risk factors (demographic, lifestyle and occupational) and BMI: men OR 1.50 (95% CI 1.12–2.00), women: OR 1.84 (95% CI 1.19–2.97) compared to the healthiest diet group. Characteristics associated with reporting a poor quality diet were employment in Scotland vs. England: men OR 1.88 (95% CI 1.53–2.32), women: OR 1.49 (95% CI 1.11–2.00), longer working hours (≥ 49 vs. ≤40 h) men: OR 1.53 (95% CI 1.21–1.92) women: OR 1.53 (95% CI 1.12–2.09). For men, job strain (high vs. low) was associated with reporting a poor diet quality OR 1.66 (95% CI 1.30–2.12). Conclusions The general population disparities in diet quality between England and Scotland were reflected in British police employees. The association of longer working hours and job strain with diet quality supports the targeting of workplace nutritional interventions.
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2018
Date of Acceptance: 13-Oct-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/52177
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1562-4
ISSN: 0044-264X
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Start Page: 2913
End Page: 2926
Journal / Book Title: European Journal of Nutrition
Volume: 57
Issue: 8
Copyright Statement: © The Author(s) 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Sponsor/Funder: National Institute for Health Research
Home Office
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Medical Research Council (MRC)
National Institute for Health Research
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Funder's Grant Number: NF-SI-0611-10136
7370192
MR/L01632X/1
MR/L01632X/1
MR/L01341X/1
RTJ6219303-1
RDF03
Keywords: Cardiometabolic risk
DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Score)
Diet
Police
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Nutrition & Dietetics
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2017-11-02
Appears in Collections:Department of Medicine
Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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