Temporal trends in orchidopexy, Great Britain, 1992-1998

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Title: Temporal trends in orchidopexy, Great Britain, 1992-1998
Authors: Toledano, MB
Hansell, AL
Jarup, L
Quinn, M
Jick, S
Elliott, P
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Concern has been expressed in recent years about worsening male reproductive health, possibly mediated by increasing exposures to environmental endocrine-disrupting agents. Trends suggested large increases in cryptorchidism in Britain and the United States between the 1950s and 1980s, although published data on recent trends have been scarce. We examined numbers of orchidopexy procedures, as a marker for cryptorchidism, using routine hospital admission data for England, Wales, and Scotland for fiscal years 1992–1993 through 1998–1999. Annual trends in orchidopexy rates were analyzed by age, in-patient admission versus day case, and geographical region. Orchidopexy rates were also obtained from the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) for England to cross-validate the hospital admissions data. Orchidopexy rates for boys 0–14 years old fell by 33% (from 23.5 to 15.8 per 10,000 population) between 1992 and 1998, with the steepest decline (50%) in 5–9-year-olds. The decreasing trend for 0–14-year-olds was evident in every region in England, in Wales, and in Scotland. Rates remained stable for men 15 or more years old, at 0.7 per 10,000. There was a marked shift from in-patient to day-case procedures. Rates from the GPRD showed a similar downward trend to the hospital data. Our findings could represent either an underlying decrease in the frequency of undescended testis or a fairly dramatic improvement in the diagnosis of cryptorchidism—resulting in fewer orchidopexies performed for retractile testis—in Great Britain during the 1990s, or both. Either way, our findings do not support the postulate of a recent worsening of male reproductive health of the scale suggested by some recent commentators on the endocrine disruptor hypothesis. Key words: cryptorchidism, endocrine, orchidopexy, routine health data, temporal trends, testes
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2003
Date of Acceptance: 5-Aug-2002
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/52114
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.5446
ISSN: 0091-6765
Publisher: The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Start Page: 129
End Page: 132
Journal / Book Title: Environmental Health Perspectives
Volume: 111
Issue: 1
Copyright Statement: This article is freely available at https://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.5446
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Toxicology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
PUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SCI
cryptorchidism
endocrine
orchidopexy
routine health data
temporal trends
testes
PRACTICE RESEARCH DATABASE
TESTICULAR CANCER
CRYPTORCHIDISM
TESTIS
HYPOSPADIAS
ASCENT
HEALTH
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptorchidism
Endocrine Glands
Hormones
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prevalence
Risk Factors
Testicular Neoplasms
Time
United Kingdom
Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male
11 Medical And Health Sciences
05 Environmental Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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