Thermochemical functionalisation of graphenes with minimal framework damage

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Title: Thermochemical functionalisation of graphenes with minimal framework damage
Authors: Hu, S
Laker, ZPL
Leese, HS
Rubio, N
De Marco, M
Au, H
Skilbeck, MS
Wilson, NR
Shaffer, MSP
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Graphene and graphene nanoplatelets can be functionalised via a gas-phase thermochemical method; the approach is versatile, readily scalable, and avoids the introduction of additional defects by exploiting existing sites. Direct TEM imaging confirmed covalent modification of single layer graphene, without damaging the connectivity of the lattice, as supported by Raman spectrometry and AFM nano-indentation measurements of mechanical stiffness. The grafting methodology can also be applied to commercially-available bulk graphene nanoplatelets, as illustrated by the preparation of anionic, cationic, and non-ionic derivatives. Successful bulk functionalisation is evidenced by TGA, Raman, and XPS, as well as in dramatic changes in aqueous dispersability. Thermochemical functionalisation thus provides a facile approach to modify both graphene monolayers, and a wide range of graphene-related nanocarbons, using variants of simple CVD equipment.
Issue Date: 16-Jun-2017
Date of Acceptance: 15-Jun-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/51766
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6sc05603b
ISSN: 2041-6520
Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry
Start Page: 6149
End Page: 6154
Journal / Book Title: Chemical Science
Volume: 8
Issue: 9
Copyright Statement: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence.
Keywords: Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Chemistry, Multidisciplinary
Chemistry
CHEMICALLY DERIVED GRAPHENE
THERMAL REDUCTION
MULTISLICE METHOD
CARBON NANOTUBES
OXIDE
SCATTERING
OXYGEN
SPECTROSCOPY
NANOSHEETS
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Chemistry
Faculty of Natural Sciences



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