Eco-efficient cements: Potential economically viable solutions for a low-CO2 cement- based materials industry

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Title: Eco-efficient cements: Potential economically viable solutions for a low-CO2 cement- based materials industry
Authors: Scrivener, KL
John, VM
Gartner, EM
Item Type: Report
Abstract: This report summarises the main conclusions of a study carried out by a multi-stakeholder working group initiated by UNEP’s Sustainable Building and Climate Initiative. The primary aim was to analyse new materials-based approaches to reducing the CO2 emissions associated with the manufacture of cement-based materials that could be implemented in addition to current industry measures plus the main new technical approach, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS), outlined in the first sectoral low-carbon technology roadmap proposed by the WBCSD/IEA partnership in 2009. The report shows that there are several new materials-based solutions that could provide significant CO2 emissions reductions at costs below those of CCS. To help these solutions become accepted on a large scale, new or enhanced standards better adapted to actual applications will be necessary. Both the implementation of existing and the development of new (improved or breakthrough) mitigation technologies will require significant funding to cover the costs of R&D, industrial investments and technical transfer. Better education at all levels from the unskilled user to scientists and engineers is also crucial to progress.
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/51016
Publisher: United Nations Environment Program
Journal / Book Title: Eco-efficient cements: Potential economically viable solutions for a low-CO2 cement-based materials industry
Copyright Statement: © United Nations Environment Programme, Paris 2016
Keywords: Cement
Concrete
Sustainability
CO2 emissions
Eco-efficiency
Place of Publication: Paris
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering



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