Monitoring asthma: current knowledge and future perspectives

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Title: Monitoring asthma: current knowledge and future perspectives
Authors: Bonini, M
Usmani, OS
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Asthma is a heterogeneous chronic respiratory disease. For many years, clinicians have classified and managed it according to severity. However, disease severity is largely affected by several external factors. Therefore, it has been recommended that ideal asthma management should primarily aim to achieve and maintain disease control. However, despite effective therapeutic options, a large proportion of patients do not manage to achieve satisfactory asthma control, often due to lack of adequate compliance. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with a relevant socioeconomic burden in terms of mortality, morbidity, quality of life and healthcare costs, in both adult and pediatric patients. Careful and constant disease monitoring therefore assumes a crucial role in allowing treatment adjustments and ensuring that therapy goals are met. This article provides a review of the currently available outcomes to monitor asthma control, as well as of innovative solutions to improve asthma management in the near future.
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2016
Date of Acceptance: 1-Dec-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/50852
ISSN: 0026-4954
Publisher: Edizioni Minerva Medica
Start Page: 106
End Page: 118
Journal / Book Title: Minerva Pneumologica
Volume: 55
Issue: 4
Copyright Statement: © 2016 Edizioni Minerva Medica
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Respiratory System
Asthma
Physiologic monitoring
Biomarkers
EXHALED NITRIC-OXIDE
OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY-DISEASE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
EOSINOPHIL CATIONIC PROTEIN
SMALL AIRWAYS DISEASE
BREATH CONDENSATE
CHILDHOOD ASTHMA
LUNG-FUNCTION
INDUCED SPUTUM
INHALED CORTICOSTEROIDS
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:National Heart and Lung Institute
Airway Disease
Faculty of Medicine



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