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Facile Preparation of Drug-Loaded Tristearin Encapsulated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Using Coaxial Electrospray Processing

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Final-Manuscript-ACS Biomacromol_revised_version_pwm_2017_04_18.docxAccepted version2.41 MBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Supporting Information-ACS Mol_Pharma-Final_2017.docxSupporting information1.16 MBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Title: Facile Preparation of Drug-Loaded Tristearin Encapsulated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Using Coaxial Electrospray Processing
Authors: Rasekh, M
Ahmad, Z
Cross, R
Hernandez-Gil, J
Wilton-Ely, JDET
Miller, PW
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Naturally occurring polymers are promising biocompatible materials that have many applications for emerging therapies, drug delivery systems, and diagnostic agents. The handling and processing of such materials still constitutes a major challenge, which can limit the full exploitation of their properties. This study explores an ambient environment processing technique: coaxial electrospray (CO-ES) to encapsulate genistein (an isoflavonoid and model drug), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs, 10–15 nm), and a fluorophore (BODIPY) into a layered (triglyceride tristearin shell) particulate system, with a view to constructing a theranostic agent. Mode mapping of CO-ES led to an optimized atomization engineering window for stable jetting, leading to encapsulation of SPIONs within particles of diameter 0.65–1.2 μm and drug encapsulation efficiencies of around 92%. Electron microscopy was used to image the encapsulated SPIONs and confirm core–shell triglyceride encapsulation in addition to further physicochemical characterization (AFM, FTIR, DSC, and TGA). Cell viability assays (MTT, HeLa cells) were used to determine optimal SPION loaded particles (∼1 mg/mL), while in vitro release profile experiments (PBS, pH = 7.4) demonstrate a triphasic release profile. Further cell studies confirmed cell uptake and internalization at selected time points (t = 1, 2, and 4 h). The results suggest potential for using the CO-ES technique as an efficient way to encapsulate SPIONs together with sensitive drugs for the development of multimodal particles that have potential application for combined imaging and therapy.
Issue Date: 26-Apr-2017
Date of Acceptance: 26-Apr-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/49396
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.7b00109
ISSN: 1543-8384
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Start Page: 2010
End Page: 2023
Journal / Book Title: MOLECULAR PHARMACEUTICS
Volume: 14
Issue: 6
Copyright Statement: © 2017 American Chemical Society. This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in Molecular Pharmaceutics, after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.7b00109
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, Research & Experimental
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
Research & Experimental Medicine
encapsulation
electrospraying
imaging
drug delivery
nanoparticle
theranostics
SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES
IN-VITRO
CELLULAR UPTAKE
SURFACE-CHARGE
ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC ATOMIZATION
BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS
CANCER
DELIVERY
MICROPARTICLES
TOXICITY
1115 Pharmacology And Pharmaceutical Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Chemistry
Catalysis and Advanced Materials
Faculty of Natural Sciences



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