Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to hepatocellular carcinoma in a multi-centre, European cohort study

Title: Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to hepatocellular carcinoma in a multi-centre, European cohort study
Authors: Bamia, C
Lagiou, P
Jenab, M
Aleksandrova, K
Fedirko, V
Trichopoulos, D
Overvad, K
Tjonneland, A
Olsen, A
Clavel-Chapelon, F
Boutron-Ruault, M-C
Kvaskoff, M
Katzke, VA
Kuehn, T
Boeing, H
Noethlings, U
Palli, D
Sieri, S
Panico, S
Tumino, R
Naccarati, A
Bueno-de-Mesquita, HBA
Peeters, PHM
Weiderpass, E
Skeie, G
Quiros, JR
Agudo, A
Chirlaque, M-D
Sanchez, M-J
Ardanaz, E
Dorronsoro, M
Ericson, U
Nilsson, LM
Wennberg, M
Khaw, K-T
Wareham, N
Key, TJ
Travis, RC
Ferrari, P
Stepien, M
Duarte-Salles, T
Norat, T
Murphy, N
Riboli, E
Trichopoulou, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Vegetable and/or fruit intakes in association with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk have been investigated in case–control studies conducted in specific European countries and cohort studies conducted in Asia, with inconclusive results. No multi-centre European cohort has investigated the indicated associations. methods: In 486 799 men/women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition, we identified 201 HCC cases after 11 years median follow-up. We calculated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for HCC incidence for sex-specific quintiles and per 100 g d−1 increments of vegetable/fruit intakes. results: Higher vegetable intake was associated with a statistically significant, monotonic reduction of HCC risk: HR (100 g d−1 increment): 0.83; 95% CI: 0.71–0.98. This association was consistent in sensitivity analyses with no apparent heterogeneity across strata of HCC risk factors. Fruit intake was not associated with HCC incidence: HR (100 g d−1 increment): 1.01; 95% CI: 0.92–1.11. conclusions: Vegetable, but not fruit, intake is associated with lower HCC risk with no evidence for heterogeneity of this association in strata of important HCC risk factors. Mechanistic studies should clarify pathways underlying this association. Given that HCC prognosis is poor and that vegetables are practically universally accessible, our results may be important, especially for those at high risk for the disease.
Issue Date: 5-Mar-2015
Date of Acceptance: 3-Dec-2014
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/48765
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2014.654
ISSN: 0007-0920
Publisher: Cancer Research UK
Start Page: 1273
End Page: 1282
Journal / Book Title: British Journal of Cancer
Volume: 112
Copyright Statement: © 2015 Cancer Research UK. All rights reserved
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Oncology
hepatocellular carcinoma
liver cancer
vegetable
fruit
EPIC
cohort
RISK-FACTORS
LIVER-CANCER
NUTRITION
COUNTRIES
CELLS
HEPATOCARCINOGENESIS
EPIDEMIOLOGY
PREVENTION
DISEASE
PROJECT
Aged
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diet
Europe
Female
Fruit
Humans
Liver Neoplasms
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Factors
Vegetables
Humans
Fruit
Vegetables
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular
Liver Neoplasms
Diet
Risk Factors
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Aged
Middle Aged
Europe
Female
Male
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Oncology
hepatocellular carcinoma
liver cancer
vegetable
fruit
EPIC
cohort
RISK-FACTORS
LIVER-CANCER
NUTRITION
COUNTRIES
CELLS
HEPATOCARCINOGENESIS
EPIDEMIOLOGY
PREVENTION
DISEASE
PROJECT
Oncology & Carcinogenesis
1112 Oncology And Carcinogenesis
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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