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A metabolomic study of biomarkers of meat and fish intake

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Title: A metabolomic study of biomarkers of meat and fish intake
Authors: Cheung, W
Keski-Rahkonen, P
Assi, N
Ferrari, P
Freisling, H
Rinaldi, S
Slimani, N
Zamora-Ros, R
Rundle, M
Frost, G
Gibbons, H
Carr, E
Brennan, L
Cross, AJ
Pala, V
Panico, S
Sacerdote, C
Palli, D
Tumino, R
Kuehn, T
Kaaks, R
Boeing, H
Floegel, A
Mancini, F
Boutron-Ruault, M-C
Baglietto, L
Trichopoulou, A
Naska, A
Orfanos, P
Scalbert, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background: Meat and fish intakes have been associated with various chronic diseases. The use of specific biomarkers may help to assess meat and fish intake and improve subject classification according to the amount and type of meat or fish consumed. Objective: A metabolomic approach was applied to search for biomarkers of meat and fish intake in a dietary intervention study and in free-living subjects from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Design: In the dietary intervention study, 4 groups of 10 subjects consumed increasing quantities of chicken, red meat, processed meat, and fish over 3 successive weeks. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected during each period and analyzed by high-resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Signals characteristic of meat or fish intake were replicated in 50 EPIC subjects for whom a 24-h urine sample and 24-h dietary recall were available and who were selected for their exclusive intake or no intake of any of the 4 same foods. Results: A total of 249 mass spectrometric features showed a positive dose-dependent response to meat or fish intake in the intervention study. Eighteen of these features best predicted intake of the 4 food groups in the EPIC urine samples on the basis of partial receiver operator curve analyses with permutation testing (areas under the curve ranging between 0.61 and 1.0). Of these signals, 8 metabolites were identified. Anserine was found to be specific for chicken intake, whereas trimethylamine-N-oxide showed good specificity for fish. Carnosine and 3 acylcarnitines (acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, and 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine) appeared to be more generic indicators of meat and meat and fish intake, respectively. Conclusion: The meat and fish biomarkers identified in this work may be used to study associations between meat and fish intake and disease risk in epidemiologic studies. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01684917.
Issue Date: 25-Jan-2017
Date of Acceptance: 27-Dec-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/48694
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.146639
ISSN: 0002-9165
Publisher: American Society for Nutrition
Start Page: 600
End Page: 608
Journal / Book Title: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume: 105
Issue: 3
Copyright Statement: © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.
Sponsor/Funder: Commission of the European Communities
Funder's Grant Number: 289511
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
dietary biomarkers
anserine
acylcarnitines
carnosine
trimethylamine-N-oxide
chicken
red meat
processed meat
fish
metabolomics
TRIMETHYLAMINE-N-OXIDE
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
URINARY-EXCRETION
L-HISTIDINE
CONSUMPTION
DIETARY
METAANALYSIS
DATABASE
RISK
1-METHYLHISTIDINE
Adult
Aged
Amines
Animals
Area Under Curve
Biomarkers
Chickens
Diet
Dipeptides
Feeding Behavior
Female
Fishes
Humans
Male
Meat
Metabolome
Metabolomics
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Seafood
11 Medical And Health Sciences
09 Engineering
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Department of Medicine
Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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