A 24-Hour Study of the Hypothalamo-Pituitary Axes in Huntington's Disease

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Title: A 24-Hour Study of the Hypothalamo-Pituitary Axes in Huntington's Disease
Author(s): Kalliolia, E
Silajdzic, E
Nambron, R
Costelloe, SJ
Martin, NG
Hill, NR
Frost, C
Watt, HC
Hindmarsh, P
Bjorkqvist, M
Warner, TT
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background: Huntington’s disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Patients exhibit other symptoms including sleep and mood disturbances, muscle atrophy and weight loss which may be linked to hypothalamic pathology and dysfunction of hypothalamo-pituitary axes. Methods: We studied neuroendocrine profiles of corticotropic, somatotropic and gonadotropic hypothalamo-pituitary axes hormones over a 24-hour period in controlled environment in 15 healthy controls, 14 premanifest and 13 stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects. We also quantified fasting levels of vasopressin, oestradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free total thyroxine, prolactin, adrenaline and noradrenaline. Somatotropic axis hormones, growth hormone releasing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like factor binding protein-3 were quantified at 06:00 (fasting), 15:00 and 23:00. A battery of clinical tests, including neurological rating and function scales were performed. Results: 24-hour concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone did not differ significantly between the Huntington’s disease group and controls. Daytime growth hormone secretion was similar in control and Huntington’s disease subjects. Stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects had lower concentration of post-sleep growth hormone pulse and higher insulin-like growth factor-1:growth hormone ratio which did not reach significance. In Huntington’s disease subjects, baseline levels of hypothalamo-pituitary axis hormones measured did not significantly differ from those of healthy controls. Conclusions: The relatively small subject group means that the study may not detect subtle perturbations in hormone concentrations. A targeted study of the somatotropic axis in larger cohorts may be warranted. However, the lack of significant results despite many variables being tested does imply that the majority of them do not differ substantially between HD and controls.
Publication Date: 2-Oct-2015
Date of Acceptance: 6-Sep-2015
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/48520
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138848
ISSN: 1932-6203
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Journal / Book Title: PLOS One
Volume: 10
Issue: 10
Copyright Statement: © 2015 Kalliolia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
Keywords: Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
GROWTH-HORMONE-SECRETION
PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS
LATERAL TUBERAL NUCLEUS
TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODEL
GH-RELEASING HORMONE
CAG REPEAT NUMBER
PROLACTIN SECRETION
PLASMA THYROTROPIN
DIABETES-MELLITUS
ENDOGENOUS-DEPRESSION
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Huntington Disease
Hydrocortisone
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System
Male
Middle Aged
Vasopressins
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System
Humans
Huntington Disease
Hydrocortisone
Vasopressins
Adult
Aged
Middle Aged
Female
Male
General Science & Technology
MD Multidisciplinary
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: ARTN e0138848
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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