Estimating particulate exposure from modern Municipal Waste Incinerators (MWIs) in Great Britain.

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Title: Estimating particulate exposure from modern Municipal Waste Incinerators (MWIs) in Great Britain.
Author(s): Douglas, P
Freni Sterrantino, A
Leal Sanchez, M
Ashworth, D
Ghosh, R
Fecht, D
Font, A
Blangiardo, M
Gulliver, J
Toledano, MB
Elliott, P
De Hoogh, C
Fuller, GW
Hansell, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Municipal Waste Incineration (MWI) is regulated through the European Union Directive on Industrial Emissions (IED), but there is ongoing public concern regarding potential hazards to health. Using dispersion modeling, we estimated spatial variability in PM10 concentrations arising from MWIs at postcodes (average 12 households) within 10 km of MWIs in Great Britain (GB) in 2003–2010. We also investigated change points in PM10 emissions in relation to introduction of EU Waste Incineration Directive (EU-WID) (subsequently transposed into IED) and correlations of PM10 with SO2, NOx, heavy metals, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furan (PCDD/F), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) emissions. Yearly average modeled PM10 concentrations were 1.00 × 10–5 to 5.53 × 10–2 μg m–3, a small contribution to ambient background levels which were typically 6.59–2.68 × 101 μg m–3, 3–5 orders of magnitude higher. While low, concentration surfaces are likely to represent a spatial proxy of other relevant pollutants. There were statistically significant correlations between PM10 and heavy metal compounds (other heavy metals (r = 0.43, p = <0.001)), PAHs (r = 0.20, p = 0.050), and PCBs (r = 0.19, p = 0.022). No clear change points were detected following EU-WID implementation, possibly as incinerators were operating to EU-WID standards before the implementation date. Results will be used in an epidemiological analysis examining potential associations between MWIs and health outcomes.
Publication Date: 16-Jun-2017
Date of Acceptance: 8-May-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/48436
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b06478
ISSN: 0013-936X
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Start Page: 7511
End Page: 7519
Journal / Book Title: Environmental Science & Technology
Volume: 51
Issue: 13
Copyright Statement: © 2017 American Chemical Society
Sponsor/Funder: National Institute for Health Research
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Medical Research Council (MRC)
National Institute for Health Research
Public Health England
Funder's Grant Number: NF-SI-0611-10136
RDC01 79560
MR/L01632X/1
MR/L01341X/1
RTJ6219303-1
6509268
Keywords: Environmental Sciences
MD Multidisciplinary
Publication Status: Published
Embargo Date: 2018-06-16
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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