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Global investment targets for malaria control and elimination between 2016 and 2030

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Title: Global investment targets for malaria control and elimination between 2016 and 2030
Authors: Patouillard, E
Ghani, ACH
Bhatt, S
Griffin, J
Cibulskis, R
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background Access to malaria control interventions falls short of universal health coverage. The Global Technical Strategy for malaria targets at least 90% reduction in case incidence and mortality rates, and elimination in 35 countries by 2030. The potential to reach these targets will be determined in part by investments in malaria. This study estimates the financing required for malaria control and elimination over the 2016–2030 period. Methods A mathematical transmission model was used to explore the impact of increasing intervention coverage on burden and costs. The cost analysis took a public provider perspective covering all 97 malaria endemic countries and territories in 2015. All control interventions currently recommended by the WHO were considered. Cost data were sourced from procurement databases, the peer-reviewed literature, national malaria strategic plans, the WHO-CHOICE project and key informant interviews. Results Annual investments of $6.4 billion (95% uncertainty interval (UI $4.5–$9.0 billion)) by 2020, $7.7 billion (95% UI $5.4–$10.9 billion) by 2025 and $8.7 billion (95% UI $6.0–$12.3 billion) by 2030 will be required to reach the targets set in the Global Technical Strategy. These are equivalent to annual investment per person at risk of malaria of US$3.90 by 2020, US$4.30 by 2025 and US$4.40 by 2030, compared with US$2.30 if interventions were sustained at current coverage levels. The 20 countries with the highest burden in 2015 will require 88% of the total investment. Conclusions Given the challenges in increasing domestic and international funding, the efficient use of currently available resources should be a priority
Issue Date: 30-May-2017
Date of Acceptance: 4-Jan-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/48058
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjgh-2016-000176
ISSN: 2059-7908
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Journal / Book Title: BMJ Global Health
Volume: 2
Issue: 2
Copyright Statement: © 2017 The Authors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Sponsor/Funder: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Funder's Grant Number: OPP1068440
MR/K010174/1B
Publication Status: Published
Open Access location: http://gh.bmj.com/content/2/2/e000176
Article Number: e000176
Appears in Collections:Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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