The microbiome of professional athletes differs from that of more sedentary subjects in composition and particularly at the functional metabolic level.

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Title: The microbiome of professional athletes differs from that of more sedentary subjects in composition and particularly at the functional metabolic level.
Author(s): Barton, W
Penney, NC
Cronin, O
Garcia-Perez, I
Molloy, MG
Holmes, E
Shanahan, F
Cotter, PD
O'Sullivan, O
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: It is evident that the gut microbiota and factors that influence its composition and activity effect human metabolic, immunological and developmental processes. We previously reported that extreme physical activity with associated dietary adaptations, such as that pursued by professional athletes, is associated with changes in faecal microbial diversity and composition relative to that of individuals with a more sedentary lifestyle. Here we address the impact of these factors on the functionality/metabolic activity of the microbiota which reveals even greater separation between exercise and a more sedentary state. DESIGN: Metabolic phenotyping and functional metagenomic analysis of the gut microbiome of professional international rugby union players (n=40) and controls (n=46) was carried out and results were correlated with lifestyle parameters and clinical measurements (eg, dietary habit and serum creatine kinase, respectively). RESULTS: Athletes had relative increases in pathways (eg, amino acid and antibiotic biosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism) and faecal metabolites (eg, microbial produced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, propionate and butyrate) associated with enhanced muscle turnover (fitness) and overall health when compared with control groups. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in faecal microbiota between athletes and sedentary controls show even greater separation at the metagenomic and metabolomic than at compositional levels and provide added insight into the diet-exercise-gut microbiota paradigm.
Publication Date: 30-Mar-2017
Date of Acceptance: 6-Mar-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/46137
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2016-313627
ISSN: 0017-5749
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Journal / Book Title: Gut
Copyright Statement: © 2017 The Author(s). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/ This article has been accepted for publication in Gut following peer review. The definitive copyedited, typeset version Barton W, Penney NC, Cronin O, et al The microbiome of professional athletes differs from that of more sedentary subjects in composition and particularly at the functional metabolic level Gut Published Online First: 30 March 2017. doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2016-313627 is available online at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2016-313627
Keywords: DIET
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
Gastroenterology & Hepatology
1103 Clinical Sciences
1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine
Publication Status: Published
Conference Place: England
Appears in Collections:Division of Surgery
Department of Medicine
Faculty of Medicine



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