Relationship of potato consumption, total and by preparation method with blood pressure and body mass index: The International Population Study on Macronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP) US study

File Description SizeFormat 
Intake of Potato Prepared by Different Methods and Blood Pressure BMI for AHA_Final.docxAccepted version16.09 kBMicrosoft WordDownload
Title: Relationship of potato consumption, total and by preparation method with blood pressure and body mass index: The International Population Study on Macronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP) US study
Author(s): Pertiwi, K
Oude Griep, LM
Stamler, J
Chan, Q
Geleijnse, JM
Steffen, LM
Rodriguez, B
Daviglus, ML
Van Horn, L
Elliott, P
Item Type: Conference Paper
Abstract: Background: Limited evidence from prospective US cohort studies suggests that higher potato intake is associated with a higher risk of hypertension and obesity. Different preparation methods affect the nutritional composition of potatoes and are related to different dietary choices that may influence associations with blood pressure and body mass index (BMI). Objective: To investigate potato consumption, total and by preparation method, in relation to blood pressure and BMI. Methods: We used cross-sectional data of 2,195 participants aged 40 to 59 in 1996-1997 from the United States samples of the population-based INTERMAP study. During four visits, four in-depth multipass 24-hour dietary recalls and eight blood pressure measurements were collected. Reported potato intakes were categorized as fried and non-fried potatoes, using the USDA food grouping system. Potato intakes (g/1000 kcal) were averaged over four days. Regression coefficients per 2SD higher intake were estimated using multivariate linear regression analyses with adjustments for age, sex, sample, lifestyle and disease factors, and other food groups. To assess influence on the association, diet quality (by Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension adherence score), BMI, urinary sodium and potassium were added separately to the previous model. Results: Median intake of total, non-fried, and fried potatoes were 40 g/d, 23 g/d and 8 g/d, respectively. Total and non-fried potato intakes were not associated with blood pressure. The association between fried potatoes and blood pressure varied by sex (P for interaction=0.03). In women, higher fried potato intake (2SD: 20 g/1000 kcal) was associated with a +3.00 mmHg (95%CI: 1.29, 4.71) higher systolic and +1.26 mmHg (95%CI: 0.15, 2.38) higher diastolic blood pressure, which prevailed after additional, but separate, adjustments for BMI, diet quality, urinary sodium and potassium. Potato chips contributed predominantly (79%) to fried potato intake and accounted for the direct association of fried potatoes and blood pressure (+3.77 mmHg systolic (95%CI: 1.92, 5.62), and +1.80 mmHg diastolic (95%CI: 0.62, 2.98)). The association between fried potatoes and blood pressure was not found in men. In the total population, higher fried potato intake was positively associated with BMI (+0.62, 95%CI: 0.14, 1.09) but attenuated after adjustment for diet quality. Total and non-fried potatoes were not associated with BMI. Conclusions: In contrast to non-fried potato intake, fried potato consumption was directly related to blood pressure in women. This finding is in line with results of previous US cohort studies and suggests that the association of potatoes with blood pressure may depend on preparation method.
Publication Date: 7-Mar-2017
Date of Acceptance: 7-Mar-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/45502
ISSN: 0009-7322
Publisher: American Heart Association
Start Page: AP272
End Page: AP272
Journal / Book Title: Circulation
Volume: 135
Issue: Suppl. 1
Copyright Statement: © 2017 by American Heart Association, Inc.
Sponsor/Funder: University Of Northwestern
National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
Funder's Grant Number: 1 RO1 HL50490
IMTERMAP Subaward No. 60024563
0600 370 D330 1362
60024563 ICL
Conference Name: Scientific Sessions on Epidemiology and Prevention, Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health of the American Hearth Association
Keywords: Cardiovascular System & Hematology
1103 Clinical Sciences
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Publication Status: Published
Start Date: 2017-03-20
Finish Date: 2017-03-23
Conference Place: New Orleans, Louisianna, USA
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



Items in Spiral are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Creative Commons