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Dietary assessment of British police force employees: a description of diet record coding procedures and cross-sectional evaluation of dietary energy intake reporting (the airwave health monitoring study)

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Title: Dietary assessment of British police force employees: a description of diet record coding procedures and cross-sectional evaluation of dietary energy intake reporting (the airwave health monitoring study)
Authors: Gibson, R
Eriksen, R
Lamb, K
Mcmeel, Y
Vergnaud, A
Spear, J
Aresu, M
Chan, Q
Elliott, P
Frost, G
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Objectives: Dietary intake is a key aspect of occupational health. To capture the characteristics of dietary behaviour that is affected by occupational environment that may impact on disease risk, collection of prospective multi - day dietary records are required. The aims of this paper are to: i) the collection of multi da y dietary data in the Airwaves health monitoring study, ii) describe the dietary coding procedures applied and ii i ) investigate the plausibility of dietary reporting in this occupational cohort. Design: A dietary coding protocol for this large - scale study was developed to minimise coding error rate. Participants ( n 4,412) who completed 7 - day food records were included for cross - sectional analyses. Energy intake misreporting was estimated using the Goldberg method. Multivariate logistic regression models we re applied to determine participant characteristics associated with energy intake misreporting. Setting: British police force employees enrolled (2007 to 2012) into the Airwave Health Monitoring Study. Results: The mean code error rate per food diary was 3.7% (SD 3.2%). The strongest predictors of energy intake under - reporting were body mass index (BMI) and physical activity. Compared to participants with BMI <25kg/m2, those with BMI >30kg/m2 had increased odds of being classified as under - reporting energ y intake (men OR 5.20 95%CI 3.92, 6.89; women OR 2.66 95%CI 1.85, 3.83). Men and women in the highest physical activity category compared to the lowest were also more likely to be classified as under - reporting (men OR 3.33 95%CI 2.46, 4.50; women OR 4.34 9 5%CI 2.91, 6.55). Conclusions: A reproducible dietary record coding procedure h as been developed to minimise coding error in complex 7 - day diet diaries. The prevalence of energy intake under - reporting is comparable to existing national UK cohort s and, in agreement with previous studies classification of under - reporting was biased towards specific sub groups of participants.
Issue Date: 1-Apr-2017
Date of Acceptance: 23-Dec-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/43581
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012927
ISSN: 2044-6055
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Journal / Book Title: BMJ Open
Volume: 7
Copyright Statement: © 2017 The Authors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Sponsor/Funder: Home Office
National Institute for Health Research
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
National Institute for Health Research
Medical Research Council (MRC)
National Institute for Health Research
Funder's Grant Number: PG0484
NF-SI-0611-10136
RDC01 79560
RDC01 79560
MR/L01341X/1
RTJ6219303-1
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
EATING FREQUENCY
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
NATIONAL-HEALTH
ADULTS
RISK
FOOD
VALIDATION
WOMEN
EPIDEMIOLOGY
NUTRITION & DIETETICS
OCCUPATIONAL & INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE
Publication Status: Published
Open Access location: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/bmjopen/7/4/e012927.full.pdf
Article Number: e012927
Appears in Collections:Department of Medicine
Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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