Incidence and enteral feed antecedents of severe neonatal necrotising enterocolitis across neonatal networks in England, 2012-13: a whole-population surveillance study

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Title: Incidence and enteral feed antecedents of severe neonatal necrotising enterocolitis across neonatal networks in England, 2012-13: a whole-population surveillance study
Author(s): Battersby, CWS
Longford, N
Mandalia, S
Costeloe, K
Modi, N
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background Necrotising enterocolitis is a neonatal gastrointestinal inflammatory disease with high mortality and severe morbidity. This disorder is growing in global relevance as birth rates and survival of babies with low gestational age improve. Population data are scant and pathogenesis is incompletely understood, but enteral feed exposures are believed to affect risk. We aimed to quantify the national incidence of severe necrotising enterocolitis, describe variation across neonatal networks, and investigate enteral feeding-related antecedents of severe necrotising enterocolitis. Methods We undertook a 2-year national surveillance study (the UK Neonatal Collaborative Necrotising Enterocolitis [UKNC-NEC] Study) of babies born in England to quantify the burden of severe or fatal necrotising enterocolitis confirmed by laparotomy, leading to death, or both. Data on all liveborn babies admitted to neonatal units between Jan 1, 2012, and Dec 31, 2013, were obtained from the National Neonatal Research Database. In the subgroup of babies born before a gestational age of 32 weeks, we did a propensity score analysis of the effect of feeding in the first 14 postnatal days with own mother’s milk, with or without human donor milk and avoidance of bovine-origin formula, or milk fortifier, on the risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis. Findings During the study period, 118 073 babies were admitted to 163 neonatal units across 23 networks, of whom 14 678 were born before a gestational age of 32 weeks. Overall, 531 (0·4%) babies developed severe necrotising enterocolitis, of whom 247 (46·5%) died (139 after laparotomy). 462 (3·2%) of 14 678 babies born before a gestational age of 32 weeks developed severe necrotising enterocolitis, of whom 222 (48·1%) died. Among babies born before a gestational age of 32 weeks, the adjusted network incidence of necrotising enterocolitis ranged from 2·51% (95% CI 1·13–3·60) to 3·85% (2·37–5·33), with no unusual variation from the adjusted national incidence of 3·13% (2·85–3·42), despite variation in feeding practices. The absolute risk difference for babies born before a gestational age of 32 weeks who received their own mother’s milk within 7 days of birth was −0·88% (95% CI −1·15 to −0·61; relative risk 0·69, 95% CI 0·60 to 0·78; number needed to treat to prevent one case of necrotising enterocolitis 114, 95% CI 87 to 136). For babies who received no compared with any bovine-origin products within 14 days of birth, the absolute risk difference was −0·65% (−1·01 to −0·29; relative risk 0·61, 0·39 to 0·83; number needed to treat 154, 99 to 345). We were unable to assess the effect of human donor milk as use was low. Interpretation Early feeding of babies with their own mother’s milk and avoidance of bovine-origin products might reduce the risk of necrotising enterocolitis, but the absolute reduction is small. Owing to the rarity of severe necrotising enterocolitis, international collaborations are needed for adequately powered preventive trials.
Publication Date: 7-Nov-2016
Date of Acceptance: 15-Sep-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/43244
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-1253(16)30117-0
ISSN: 2468-1253
Publisher: Elsevier
Start Page: 43
End Page: 51
Journal / Book Title: Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume: 2
Issue: 1
Copyright Statement: © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Sponsor/Funder: National Institute for Health Research
Funder's Grant Number: N/A
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Department of Medicine
Faculty of Medicine



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