Altmetric

Plant fibre reinforced polymers: where do we stand in terms of tensile properties?

File Description SizeFormat 
Manuscript_resubmission_3.pdfAccepted version4.99 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Plant fibre reinforced polymers where do we stand in terms of tensile properties.pdfPublished version4.32 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Plant fibre reinforced polymers: where do we stand in terms of tensile properties?
Authors: Fortea-Verdejo, M
Bumbaris, E
Burgstaller, C
Bismarck, A
Lee, K
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Plant fibres have a unique set of properties ranging from being stiff and brittle, such as hemp and flax, to more ductile, such as coir, c ombining these properties with their cost and availability makes them attractive alternative reinforcements for the production of greener composites . This article reviews the tensile properties of various plant fibre or plant based natural fibre - reinforced polymer s reported in the literature . We critically discuss the use of plant fibres as reinforcement for the production of bio - based , renewable or green polymer composites , showing t he evolution of the properties of plant fibre composites. The reported tensile properties of plant fibre - reinforced polymer composites are compared against various renewable and n on - renewable engineering/commodity polymers as well as the tensile properties of commercially available randomly oriented glass fibre - reinforced polymers (GFRP). G reen composites containing random short plant fibres do have similar properties to randomly oriented GFRP at a lower overall part weight. U nidirectional plant fibre - reinf orced polymers offer better performance than randomly oriented GFRP and could have the potential to be adapted in applications requiring even higher mechanical performance, especially in areas where the use of costly synthetic fibres might be less attracti ve . Furthermore, plant fibres can also be regarded as effective fillers to replace more expensive polymer s and improve the green credential s of final composite parts. These features may motivate the industry to introduce more plant fibre - based products to the market.
Issue Date: 20-Jan-2017
Date of Acceptance: 5-Dec-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/43058
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09506608.2016.1271089
ISSN: 1743-2804
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Start Page: 441
End Page: 464
Journal / Book Title: International Materials Reviews
Volume: 62
Issue: 8
Copyright Statement: © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Sponsor/Funder: EPSRC
Engineering & Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC)
Funder's Grant Number: EP/M012247/1
EP/M012247/1
Keywords: Science & Technology
Technology
Materials Science, Multidisciplinary
Materials Science
Natural fibres
composites
cellulose
short fibre composites
biocomposites
polymer matrix composites
DYNAMIC-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
WOOD-PLASTIC COMPOSITES
ISOPHTHALLIC POLYESTER COMPOSITES
DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES
WATER-UPTAKE BEHAVIOR
SNAKE GRASS FIBER
NATURAL-FIBER
FLAX-FIBERS
BACTERIAL CELLULOSE
EPOXY COMPOSITES
0912 Materials Engineering
0913 Mechanical Engineering
Materials
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Engineering
Aeronautics
Chemical Engineering
Faculty of Natural Sciences



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Creative Commonsx