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Determinants of the t(14;18) translocation and their role in t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphoma

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Title: Determinants of the t(14;18) translocation and their role in t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphoma
Authors: Kelly, RS
Roulland, S
Morgado, E
Sungalee, S
Jouve, N
Tumino, R
Krogh, V
Panico, S
Polidoro, S
Masala, G
Sanchez, M-J
Chirlaque, M-D
Sala, N
Barricarte Gurrea, A
Dorronsoro, M
Travis, RC
Riboli, E
Gunter, M
Murphy, N
Vermeulen, R
Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB
Peeters, PH
Trichopoulou, A
Trichopoulos, D
Lagiou, P
Nieters, A
Canzian, F
Kaaks, R
Boeing, H
Weiderpass, E
Stocks, T
Melin, B
Overvad, K
Tjonneland, A
Olsen, A
Brennan, P
Johansson, M
Nadel, B
Vineis, P
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Purpose The strong association between t(14;18) translocation and follicular lymphoma (FL) is well known. However, the determinants of this chromosomal aberration and their role in t(14;18) associated FL remain to be established. Methods t(14;18) frequency within the B cell lymphoma 2 major breakpoint region was determined for 135 incident FL cases and 251 healthy controls as part of a nested case–control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer cohort. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed in DNA extracted from blood samples taken at recruitment. The relationship between prevalence and frequency of the translocation with baseline anthropometric, lifestyle, and dietary factors in cases and controls was determined. Unconditional logistic regression was used to explore whether the risk of FL associated with these factors differed in t(14;18)+ as compared to t(14;18)− cases. Results Among incident FL cases, educational level (χ2p = 0.021) and height (χ2p = 0.025) were positively associated with t(14;18) prevalence, and cases with high frequencies [t(14;18)HF] were significantly taller (t test p value = 0.006). These findings were not replicated in the control population, although there were a number of significant associations with dietary variables. Further analyses revealed that height was a significant risk factor for t(14;18)+ FL [OR 6.31 (95 % CI 2.11, 18.9) in the tallest versus the shortest quartile], but not t(14;18)− cases. Conclusions These findings suggest a potential role for lifestyle factors in the prevalence and frequency of the t(14;18) translocation. The observation that the etiology of FL may differ by t(14;18) status, particularly with regard to height, supports the subdivision of FL by translocation status.
Issue Date: 30-Sep-2015
Date of Acceptance: 22-Sep-2015
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/42742
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-015-0677-2
ISSN: 1573-7225
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Start Page: 1845
End Page: 1855
Journal / Book Title: Cancer Causes & Control
Volume: 26
Copyright Statement: © Springer-Verlag 2015. The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-015-0677-2.
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Oncology
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Follicular lymphoma
Translocation
t(14;18)
Height
NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA
B-CELL LYMPHOMA
HEALTHY-INDIVIDUALS
RISK-FACTORS
SUBTYPES
CANCER
FREQUENCY
BLOOD
EPIDEMIOLOGY
LYMPHOCYTES
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Female
Humans
Lymphoma, B-Cell
Lymphoma, Follicular
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Translocation, Genetic
Epidemiology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1112 Oncology And Carcinogenesis
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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