The role of macrophage IL-10/innate IFN interplay during virus-induced asthma

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Title: The role of macrophage IL-10/innate IFN interplay during virus-induced asthma
Authors: Johnston, SL
Zdrenghea, MT
Makrinioti, H
Muresan, A
Stanciu, LA
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Activation through different signaling pathways results in two functionally different types of macrophages, the pro-inflammatory (M1) and the anti-inflammatory (M2). The polarization of macrophages toward the pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype is considered to be critical for efficient antiviral immune responses in the lung. Among the various cell types that are present in the asthmatic airways, macrophages have emerged as significant participants in disease pathogenesis, because of their activation during both the inflammatory and resolution phases, with an impact on disease progression. Polarized M1 and M2 macrophages are able to reversibly undergo functional redifferentiation into anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory macrophages, respectively, and therefore, macrophages mediate both processes. Recent studies have indicated a predominance of M2 macrophages in asthmatic airways. During a virus infection, it is likely that M2 macrophages would secrete higher amounts of the suppressor cytokine IL-10, and less innate IFNs. However, the interactions between IL-10 and innate IFNs during virus-induced exacerbations of asthma have not been well studied. The possible role of IL-10 as a therapy in allergic asthma has already been suggested, but the divergent roles of this suppressor molecule in the antiviral immune response raise concerns. This review attempts to shed light on macrophage IL-10–IFNs interactions and discusses the role of IL-10 in virus-induced asthma exacerbations. Whereas IL-10 is important in terminating pro-inflammatory and antiviral immune responses, the presence of this immune regulatory cytokine at the beginning of virus infection could impair the response to viruses and play a role in virus-induced asthma exacerbations.
Issue Date: 27-Nov-2014
Date of Acceptance: 14-Oct-2014
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/42578
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rmv.1817
ISSN: 1099-1654
Publisher: Wiley
Start Page: 33
End Page: 49
Journal / Book Title: Reviews in Medical Virology
Volume: 25
Issue: 1
Copyright Statement: © 2014 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Sponsor/Funder: Wellcome Trust
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Funder's Grant Number: 083567/Z/07/Z
G1000758
G1000758-E01/2
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Virology
MONOCYTE-DERIVED MACROPHAGES
BLOOD MONONUCLEAR-CELLS
NF-KAPPA-B
ALTERNATIVELY ACTIVATED MACROPHAGES
BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL-CELLS
I INTERFERON
III INTERFERON
GENE-EXPRESSION
DENDRITIC CELLS
IL-10 PRODUCTION
Animals
Asthma
Humans
Interferons
Interleukin-10
Macrophages
Virus Diseases
Viruses
Macrophages
Animals
Humans
Viruses
Virus Diseases
Asthma
Interferons
Interleukin-10
Virology
1108 Medical Microbiology
Publication Status: Published
Open Access location: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/18449
Appears in Collections:National Heart and Lung Institute
Faculty of Medicine



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