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Temperature-dependence of the zeta potential in intact natural carbonates

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Title: Temperature-dependence of the zeta potential in intact natural carbonates
Authors: Al-Mahrouqi
Vinogradov, J
Jackson, MD
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: The zeta potential is a measure of the electrical charge on mineral surfaces and is an important control on subsurface geophysical monitoring, adsorption of polar species in aquifers, and rock wettability. We report the first measurements of zeta potential in intact, water-saturated, natural carbonate samples at temperatures up to 120°C. The zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01 M NaCl, comparable to potable water) but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5 M NaCl, comparable to seawater). The equilibrium calcium concentration resulting from carbonate dissolution also increases with increasing temperature at low ionic strength but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is correlated with the temperature dependence of the equilibrium calcium concentration and shows a Nernstian linear relationship. Our findings are applicable to many subsurface carbonate rocks at elevated temperature.
Issue Date: 17-Nov-2016
Date of Acceptance: 1-Nov-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/42366
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2016GL071151
ISSN: 1944-8007
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
Start Page: 11578
End Page: 11587
Journal / Book Title: Geophysical Research Letters
Volume: 43
Issue: 22
Copyright Statement: © 2016. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
Sponsor/Funder: Total E&P UK Limited
Funder's Grant Number: Contract Number: 4300002692
Keywords: Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
MD Multidisciplinary
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Engineering
Earth Science and Engineering



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