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Fish consumption and mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort

Title: Fish consumption and mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort
Authors: Engeset, D
Braaten, T
Teucher, B
Kuhn, T
Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB
Leenders, M
Agudo, A
Bergmann, MM
Valanou, E
Naska, A
Trichopoulou, A
Key, TJ
Crowe, FL
Overvad, K
Sonestedt, E
Mattiello, A
Peeters, PH
Wennberg, M
Jansson, JH
Boutron-Ruault, M-C
Dossus, L
Dartois, L
Li, K
Barricarte, A
Ward, H
Riboli, E
Agnoli, C
Maria Huerta, J
Sanchez, M-J
Tumino, R
Altzibar, JM
Vineis, P
Masala, G
Ferrari, P
Muller, DC
Johansson, M
Luisa Redondo, M
Tjonneland, A
Olsen, A
Olsen, KS
Brustad, M
Skeie, G
Lund, E
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Fish is a source of important nutrients and may play a role in preventing heart diseases and other health outcomes. However, studies of overall mortality and cause-specific mortality related to fish consumption are inconclusive. We examined the rate of overall mortality, as well as mortality from ischaemic heart disease and cancer in relation to the intake of total fish, lean fish, and fatty fish in a large prospective cohort including ten European countries. More than 500,000 men and women completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992–1999 and were followed up for mortality until the end of 2010. 32,587 persons were reported dead since enrolment. Hazard ratios and their 99 % confidence interval were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. Fish consumption was examined using quintiles based on reported consumption, using moderate fish consumption (third quintile) as reference, and as continuous variables, using increments of 10 g/day. All analyses were adjusted for possible confounders. No association was seen for fish consumption and overall or cause-specific mortality for both the categorical and the continuous analyses, but there seemed to be a U-shaped trend (p < 0.000) with fatty fish consumption and total mortality and with total fish consumption and cancer mortality (p = 0.046).
Issue Date: 7-Nov-2014
Date of Acceptance: 23-Oct-2014
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/41200
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10654-014-9966-4
ISSN: 1573-7284
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Start Page: 57
End Page: 70
Journal / Book Title: European Journal of Epidemiology
Volume: 30
Issue: 1
Copyright Statement: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Mortality
Fish consumption
Cohort
Lean fish
Fatty fish
Multi-centre study
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
DANISH ADULTS
RISK
MEAT
METAANALYSIS
CALIBRATION
FISHERMEN
MODELS
CONTAMINANTS
DIETARY
Adult
Aged
Animals
Diet
Europe
Fatty Acids, Omega-3
Female
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia
Neoplasms
Nutritional Status
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Seafood
Surveys and Questionnaires
Questionnaires
Epidemiology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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