Effect of residual stress on the fracture of chemically strengthened thin aluminosilicate glass

Title: Effect of residual stress on the fracture of chemically strengthened thin aluminosilicate glass
Authors: Jiang, L
Wang, L
Mohagheghian, I
Li, X
Guo, X
L, L
Dear, JP
Yan, Y
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: The effect of residual stress on the fracture of chemically strengthened thin aluminosilicate glass was investigated. The large deflection problem on the flexure of thin chemically strengthened glass was solved through finite element analysis. The relationship among compressive stress (CS), central tension (CT), and the modulus of rupture of chemically strengthened thin glass was also discussed. High CS and low CT improved the flexural strength of chemically strengthened glass. However, the effect of residual stress was more complex on Weibull modulus than on strength. The effect of residual stress on the fractography of chemically strengthened thin glass was analyzed. Transparent and opaque zones were observed on the fracture surface of chemically strengthened glass. The relative thickness of the opaque zone (dOpaque/d0), which is a constant in the same fracture zone, linearly decreased with increasing fracture zone. This result indicates that the stored elastic strain energy was released with the number of transverse cracks. These results provide useful information on the failure analysis of chemically strengthened thin glass.
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2016
Date of Acceptance: 21-Sep-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/41114
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10853-016-0434-2
ISSN: 1573-4803
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Start Page: 1405
End Page: 1415
Journal / Book Title: Journal of Materials Science
Volume: 52
Issue: 3
Copyright Statement: © Springer Verlag 2016. The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10853-016-0434-2.
Keywords: Materials
09 Engineering
03 Chemical Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Engineering
Mechanical Engineering



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