Altmetric

Symbiotic options for the conquest of land

Publication available at: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/89158/
Title: Symbiotic options for the conquest of land
Authors: Field, KJ
Pressel, S
Duckett, JG
Rimington, WR
Bidartondo, MI
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed identity and biology of the fungi engaged in symbiosis with the earliest-diverging lineages of extant land plants. Here, we reconsider the existing paradigm and show that the symbiotic options available to the first plants emerging onto the land were more varied than previously thought.
Issue Date: 22-Jun-2015
Date of Acceptance: 1-Jun-2015
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/40962
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2015.05.007
ISSN: 0169-5347
Publisher: Elsevier
Start Page: 477
End Page: 486
Journal / Book Title: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
Volume: 30
Issue: 8
Sponsor/Funder: Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)
Funder's Grant Number: NE/I027193/1
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Genetics & Heredity
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
mycorrhiza
plant evolution
symbiosis
mutualism
paleobotany
fungi
ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI
ATMOSPHERIC CO2
CARBON AVAILABILITY
PLANT SYMBIOSIS
RHYNIE CHERT
EVOLUTION
LIVERWORTS
ASSOCIATIONS
ORIGIN
ROOTS
Biological Evolution
Embryophyta
Fossils
Fungi
Mycorrhizae
Phylogeny
Symbiosis
06 Biological Sciences
05 Environmental Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Open Access location: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/89158/
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Natural Sciences



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Creative Commonsx