Role of metabolic phenotyping in understanding obesity and related conditions in Gulf Co-operation Council countries

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Title: Role of metabolic phenotyping in understanding obesity and related conditions in Gulf Co-operation Council countries
Authors: Ahmad, MS
Ashrafian, H
Alsaleh, M
Holmes, E
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Obesity is a major health concern in the Middle East and the incidence is rising in all sections of the population. Efforts to control obesity through diet and lifestyle interventions, and by surgical means, have had limited effect, and the gene–environment interactions underpinning the development of obesity and related pathologies such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and certain cancers are poorly defined. Lifestyle, genetics, inflammation and the interaction between the intestinal bacteria and host metabolism have all been implicated in creating an obesogenic environment. We summarize the role of metabolic and microbial phenotyping in understanding the aetiopathogenesis of obesity and in characterizing the metabolic responses to surgical and non-surgical interventions, and explore the potential for clinical translation of this approach.
Issue Date: 16-Nov-2015
Date of Acceptance: 1-Oct-2015
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/38995
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cob.12121
ISSN: 1758-8111
Publisher: Wiley
Start Page: 302
End Page: 311
Journal / Book Title: Clinical Obesity
Volume: 5
Issue: 6
Copyright Statement: © 2015 World Obesity. This is the accepted version of the following article: Ahmad, M. S., Ashrafian, H., Alsaleh, M. and Holmes, E. (2015), Role of metabolic phenotyping in understanding obesity and related conditions in Gulf Co-operation Council countries. Clinical Obesity, 5: 302–311, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cob.12121.
Keywords: Diabetes
Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries
metabolic profiling
obesity
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Division of Surgery
Faculty of Medicine



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