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Television-based health promotion in general practice waiting rooms in London: a cross-sectional study evaluating patients’ knowledge and intentions to access dental services

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Title: Television-based health promotion in general practice waiting rooms in London: a cross-sectional study evaluating patients’ knowledge and intentions to access dental services
Authors: Jawad, M
Ingram, S
Choudhury, I
Airebamen, A
Christodoulou, K
Wilson Sharma, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate whether television-based dental health promotion initiatives in General Practice waiting rooms would increase patients knowledge of and intentions to seek dental services.This cross-sectional survey of 2,345 patients attending 49 General Practices in Brent, northwest London, evaluated the Life Channel - a series of six brief health promotion advertisements, including one dental health promotion advertisement, displayed over ten minutes on television in General Practice waiting rooms. Primary outcome measures were a self-reported gain in the knowledge to contact a National Health Service (NHS) and emergency dentist, and an intention to seek dental services, attributed to viewing the Life Channel.Among the 1,088 patients who did not know how to contact an NHS dentist prior to the survey, and the 1,247 patients who did not know how to contact an emergency dentist prior to the survey, 48.0 % (95 % CI 45.0-51.0 %) and 35.1 % (95 % CI 32.4-37.8 %) attributed the Life Channel to educating them how to do so, respectively. Among the 1,605 patients who did not have any intention to contact a dentist prior to the survey, 15.2 % (95 % CI 13.4-17.0 %) attributed the Life Channel to creating such an intention. We report adjusted odds ratios on sociodemographic disparities in this evaluation.Television-based dental health promotion may significantly increase knowledge of and intention to seek dental services in this sample in London. Television-based dental health promotion may appeal more to certain population groups. More research is needed to identify longer term outcomes of television-based health promotion.
Issue Date: 20-Jul-2016
Date of Acceptance: 8-Jul-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/34562
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12903-016-0252-6
ISSN: 1472-6831
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal / Book Title: BMC Oral Health
Volume: 17
Copyright Statement: © 2016 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Dentistry
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: 24
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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