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Stress echocardiography in patients with morbid obesity

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Title: Stress echocardiography in patients with morbid obesity
Authors: Shah, BN
Senior, R
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: The incidence of significant obesity is rising across the globe. These patients often have a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and are frequently referred for noninvasive cardiac imaging tests. Stress echocardiography (SE) is widely used for assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), but its clinical utility in morbidly obese patients (in whom image quality may suffer due to body habitus) has been largely unknown. The recently published Stress Ultrasonography in Morbid Obesity (SUMO) study has shown that SE, when performed appropriately with ultrasound contrast agents (whether performed with physiological or pharmacological stress), has excellent feasibility and appropriately risk stratifies morbidly obese patients, including identification of patients who require revascularization. This article reviews the evidence supporting the use of echocardiographic techniques in morbidly obese patients for assessment of known or suspected CAD and briefly discusses other noninvasive modalities, including magnetic resonance and nuclear techniques, comparing and contrasting these techniques against SE.
Issue Date: 1-Jun-2016
Date of Acceptance: 7-Apr-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/33634
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1530/ERP-16-0010
ISSN: 2055-0464
Publisher: BioScientifica: Echo Research and Practice
Start Page: R13
End Page: R18
Journal / Book Title: Echo Research and Practice
Volume: 3
Issue: 2
Copyright Statement: © 2016 The Authors. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Keywords: cardiac imaging
obesity
stress echocardiography
ultrasound contrast
Publication Status: Published
Conference Place: England
Appears in Collections:National Heart and Lung Institute
Faculty of Medicine



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