Barriers and facilitators of key stakeholders to implement remote monitoring technologies: a protocol for a mixed-methods analysis

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Title: Barriers and facilitators of key stakeholders to implement remote monitoring technologies: a protocol for a mixed-methods analysis
Authors: Iqbal, F
Joshi, M
Khan, S
Wright, M
Ashrafian, H
Darzi, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background: Implementation of novel digital solutions within the National Health Service (NHS) has historically been challenging. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a greater push for digitisation and for operating remote monitoring solutions. However, the implementation and widespread adoption of this type of innovation has been poorly studied. Objective: to investigate key stakeholder barriers and facilitators of implementing remote monitoring solutions, identifying factors that could affect successful adoption. Methods: A mixed methods approach will be implemented: semi-structured interviews will be conducted with high level stakeholders from industry, academia, and healthcare providers who have played an instrumental role with prior experience of implementing digital solutions alongside the use of an adapted version of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) questionnaire. Results: Enrolment is currently underway, having started in February 2022; it is anticipated to end in July 2022 with data analysis to commence in August 2022. Conclusions: the results of this study may highlight key barriers and facilitators in implementing digital remote monitoring solutions, allowing for improved future widespread adoption with the NHS. Clinical trials registration information: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT05321004
Date of Acceptance: 24-Jun-2022
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/97902
ISSN: 1929-0748
Publisher: JMIR Publications
Journal / Book Title: JMIR Research Protocols
Copyright Statement: This paper is embargoed until publication. Once published it will be available fully open access.
Keywords: 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Publication Status: Accepted
Embargo Date: This item is embargoed until publication
Appears in Collections:Department of Surgery and Cancer
Institute of Global Health Innovation



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