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The protective performance of modern motorcycle helmets under oblique impacts

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Title: The protective performance of modern motorcycle helmets under oblique impacts
Authors: Yu, X
Logan, I
Sarasola, IDP
Dasaratha, A
Ghajari, M
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Motorcyclists are at high risk of head injuries, including skull fractures, focal brain injuries, intracranial bleeding and diffuse brain injuries. New helmet technologies have been developed to mitigate head injuries in motorcycle collisions, but there is limited information on their performance under commonly occurring oblique impacts. We used an oblique impact method to assess the performance of seven modern motorcycle helmets at five impact locations. Four helmets were fitted with rotational management technologies: a low friction layer (MIPS), three-layer liner system (Flex) and dampers-connected liner system (ODS). Helmets were dropped onto a 45° anvil at 8 m/s at five locations. We determined peak translational and rotational accelerations (PTA and PRA), peak rotational velocity (PRV) and brain injury criteria (BrIC). In addition, we used a human head finite element model to predict strain distribution across the brain and in corpus callosum and sulci. We found that the impact location affected the injury metrics and brain strain, but this effect was not consistent. The rear impact produced lowest PTAs but highest PRAs. This impact produced highest strain in corpus callosum. The front impact produced the highest PRV and BrIC. The side impact produced the lowest PRV, BrIC and strain across the brain, sulci and corpus callosum. Among helmet technologies, MIPS reduced all injury metrics and brain strain compared with conventional helmets. Flex however was effective in reducing PRA only and ODS was not effective in reducing any injury metrics in comparison with conventional helmets. This study shows the importance of using different impact locations and injury metrics when assessing head protection effects of helmets. It also provides new data on the performance of modern motorcycle helmets. These results can help with improving helmet design and standard and rating test methods.
Issue Date: 13-Apr-2022
Date of Acceptance: 4-Apr-2022
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/96862
DOI: 10.1007/s10439-022-02963-8
ISSN: 0090-6964
Publisher: Springer
Journal / Book Title: Annals of Biomedical Engineering
Copyright Statement: © The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Sponsor/Funder: Innovate UK
Funder's Grant Number: 57460
Keywords: Science & Technology
Technology
Engineering, Biomedical
Engineering
Motorcycle helmet
Oblique impact
Brain injury
Head injury
Rotational acceleration
TRAUMATIC BRAIN-INJURY
INTRACRANIAL-PRESSURE
AXONAL INJURY
ACCELERATION
HEAD
LOCATION
DAMAGE
BODY
Brain injury
Head injury
Motorcycle helmet
Oblique impact
Rotational acceleration
Science & Technology
Technology
Engineering, Biomedical
Engineering
Motorcycle helmet
Oblique impact
Brain injury
Head injury
Rotational acceleration
TRAUMATIC BRAIN-INJURY
INTRACRANIAL-PRESSURE
AXONAL INJURY
ACCELERATION
HEAD
LOCATION
DAMAGE
BODY
Biomedical Engineering
09 Engineering
11 Medical and Health Sciences
Publication Status: Published online
Open Access location: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10439-022-02963-8
Online Publication Date: 2022-04-13
Appears in Collections:Dyson School of Design Engineering



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons